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Cloyd’s Mansion: landmark of security

Cloyd’s Mansion, near Route 100 just south of Cloyd’s Mountain on Back Creek, has been designated a Virginia Historical Landmark for many years. The mansion contains a history grounded in a sense of security.
Joseph Cloyd, first owner of the mansion, was a noted colonel in the U.S. military. He fought in many battles against the British military and the Shawnee tribe of West Virginia.
In 1773, Cloyd moved his family to Back Creek and lived in a log cabin for a number of years. The exact date of when his mansion was built is not known; however, it is suspected that it was the first brick structure built in the Pulaski County area.
The mansion was constructed with a brick facing. The four-foot by twelve-foot white oak beams supporting the floors and the two-inch thick pine came from the woodlands surrounding the house.
Cloyd’s Mansion is believed to be the first home built in the area by John Swope, a master builder of his time. The stairways and baluster are made of several kinds of wood. Much of the homes accents, including scrolls above the stairway and the tobacco leaf design above the mantel are hand craved and hand created.
The security derived from serving in the military was largely reflected in the physical design of the home. Many believed Cloyd’s focus on security was due to small Shawnee war parties assembled at the western border of Virginia.
The walls of the mansion were built two feet thick, as were the exterior doors, which only has knobs on the inside. The original locks of the home are massive, 11-inches by six-inch, with keys suggestive of those used for dungeons.
A two-story stone barn in back of the mansion has wide brasures around the entire top floor with narrows ventilator opening, which would serve as loopholes in the event of an attack.
To the north of Cloyd’s Mansion, Back Creek wanders through a green valley to Cloyd’s Mountain. It was at the foot where the bloody Battle of Cloyd’s Farm was fought near the close of the Civil War.
The Cloyd home was used as a hospital by the Union forces after the battle. Dark stains, believed to be bloodstains, are visible on the original pine flooring in some of the rooms.
The stone barn carries a deep scar of a cannon ball fired by Northern artillery. The mansion was left undamaged. It is known as a great landmark presenting the past of Pulaski County.

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Cloyd’s Mansion: landmark of security

Cloyd’s Mansion, near Route 100 just south of Cloyd’s Mountain on Back Creek, has been designated a Virginia Historical Landmark for many years. The mansion contains a history grounded in a sense of security.
Joseph Cloyd, first owner of the mansion, was a noted colonel in the U.S. military. He fought in many battles against the British military and the Shawnee tribe of West Virginia.
In 1773, Cloyd moved his family to Back Creek and lived in a log cabin for a number of years. The exact date of when his mansion was built is not known; however, it is suspected that it was the first brick structure built in the Pulaski County area.
The mansion was constructed with a brick facing. The four-foot by twelve-foot white oak beams supporting the floors and the two-inch thick pine came from the woodlands surrounding the house.
Cloyd’s Mansion is believed to be the first home built in the area by John Swope, a master builder of his time. The stairways and baluster are made of several kinds of wood. Much of the homes accents, including scrolls above the stairway and the tobacco leaf design above the mantel are hand craved and hand created.
The security derived from serving in the military was largely reflected in the physical design of the home. Many believed Cloyd’s focus on security was due to small Shawnee war parties assembled at the western border of Virginia.
The walls of the mansion were built two feet thick, as were the exterior doors, which only has knobs on the inside. The original locks of the home are massive, 11-inches by six-inch, with keys suggestive of those used for dungeons.
A two-story stone barn in back of the mansion has wide brasures around the entire top floor with narrows ventilator opening, which would serve as loopholes in the event of an attack.
To the north of Cloyd’s Mansion, Back Creek wanders through a green valley to Cloyd’s Mountain. It was at the foot where the bloody Battle of Cloyd’s Farm was fought near the close of the Civil War.
The Cloyd home was used as a hospital by the Union forces after the battle. Dark stains, believed to be bloodstains, are visible on the original pine flooring in some of the rooms.
The stone barn carries a deep scar of a cannon ball fired by Northern artillery. The mansion was left undamaged. It is known as a great landmark presenting the past of Pulaski County.

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