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Be ready for anything

Hurricane season officially begins on June 1, and state officials are urging residents throughout Virginia to be prepared.
Some residents in Pulaski County and other areas far from the coast may think hurricanes are of little concern to them, but they’re wrong.
“Tropical storms, depressions and hurricanes can be just as devastating to Virginians who live inland,” said Michael Cline, state coordinator for the Virginia Department of Emergency Management. “Families should get ready now by gathering emergency supplies, making a plan for loved ones, and listening to local sources for up-to-date information.”
To focus attention on the critical nature of preparing in advance, Gov. Tim Kaine has proclaimed May 25-31 as Hurricane and Flooding Preparedness Week.
Virginians living inland should plan to protect and care for themselves, their families and their pets in the event of a hurricane, tropical storm or depression. A rule of thumb for disaster preparation is to have supplies on hand to last at least three days, in case businesses are closed, roads are blocked and power is out.
Getting a family emergency kit ready means gathering essential items such as flashlights and a battery-powered radio, non-perishable canned and packaged food, a manual can opener, water, a first aid kit and medications.
Making a plan for loved ones means discussing what your family would do during an actual emergency. Decide ahead of time where your family should go to find higher ground because flash floods can develop in a matter of minutes.
We’ve said it before, but it bears repeating. The Boy Scout motto, “Be prepared,” is excellent advice for everyone.

Choose an out-of-town relative or friend to be your family’s personal contact in case family members are separated.

Instructions for hurricane and tropical storm preparation are available through local media outlets and emergency officials. Citizens should listen for information specific to their areas. Such information could include details about evacuation orders as well as how to safely stay where you are in case of emergency.

“Your safety and the safety of your loved ones depend on getting ready before a hurricane or tropical storm hits,” said Cline. “So get a kit, make a plan and stay informed.”

Historically, Virginia has suffered significant damage and loss of life from tropical storms and depressions as well as hurricanes that make landfall in other states.

For more information on the sales tax holiday and tips for preparing for hurricanes, tropical storms and flooding, visit www.vaemergency.com or www.readyvirginia.gov.

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Be ready for anything

Hurricane season officially begins on June 1, and state officials are urging residents throughout Virginia to be prepared.
Some residents in Pulaski County and other areas far from the coast may think hurricanes are of little concern to them, but they’re wrong.
“Tropical storms, depressions and hurricanes can be just as devastating to Virginians who live inland,” said Michael Cline, state coordinator for the Virginia Department of Emergency Management. “Families should get ready now by gathering emergency supplies, making a plan for loved ones, and listening to local sources for up-to-date information.”
To focus attention on the critical nature of preparing in advance, Gov. Tim Kaine has proclaimed May 25-31 as Hurricane and Flooding Preparedness Week.
Virginians living inland should plan to protect and care for themselves, their families and their pets in the event of a hurricane, tropical storm or depression. A rule of thumb for disaster preparation is to have supplies on hand to last at least three days, in case businesses are closed, roads are blocked and power is out.
Getting a family emergency kit ready means gathering essential items such as flashlights and a battery-powered radio, non-perishable canned and packaged food, a manual can opener, water, a first aid kit and medications.
Making a plan for loved ones means discussing what your family would do during an actual emergency. Decide ahead of time where your family should go to find higher ground because flash floods can develop in a matter of minutes.
We’ve said it before, but it bears repeating. The Boy Scout motto, “Be prepared,” is excellent advice for everyone.

Choose an out-of-town relative or friend to be your family’s personal contact in case family members are separated.

Instructions for hurricane and tropical storm preparation are available through local media outlets and emergency officials. Citizens should listen for information specific to their areas. Such information could include details about evacuation orders as well as how to safely stay where you are in case of emergency.

“Your safety and the safety of your loved ones depend on getting ready before a hurricane or tropical storm hits,” said Cline. “So get a kit, make a plan and stay informed.”

Historically, Virginia has suffered significant damage and loss of life from tropical storms and depressions as well as hurricanes that make landfall in other states.

For more information on the sales tax holiday and tips for preparing for hurricanes, tropical storms and flooding, visit www.vaemergency.com or www.readyvirginia.gov.

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