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Feline lives in peril at shelter

Humane Society kittenBy MELINDA WILLIAMS

melinda@southwesttimes.com

 

The arrival of spring weather has left Pulaski County Animal Shelter overwhelmed with litters of homeless kittens, putting many felines’ lives in peril if homes aren’t found for them soon.

According to Candice Simmons, executive director of Pulaski County Humane Society, the shelter recently took in 17 cats in a single day.

“Nothing is cuter than a tiny kitty cat; but unless the humane society or animal control can adopt them out, these kitties will have to be euthanized due to space issues,” she said.

In an effort to help save the lives of some of these felines, Simmons said the humane society and animal control are offering a 50 percent discount on the adoption fee for kittens and cats during the month of June.

“All of us here at the shelter are doing everything we can to save these little babies,” said Simmons. Humane society veterinarian, Dr. Laura Nelson, offered to hold a special reduced rate spay clinic in June for shelter cats and animal control agreed to waive its processing fee.

The humane society is administering the vaccines at cost.

Simmons said all pets are required to be sterilized before leaving the shelter.

“Spaying and neutering helps control the population of unwanted pets so they don’t end up in the shelter, or worse, dead along the sides of roads. It reduces the risk of certain cancers. It’s just the right thing to do,” she said.

To help save the life of a feline, consider adopting one during the month of June in order to take advantage of the discount. The shelter is at 80 Dublin Park Road, in the wooded area beyond Dublin Town Hall. Hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon.

For more information email the humane society at pchsva@gmail.com or call 674-0089.

Comments

comments

5 Responses to Feline lives in peril at shelter

  1. Daniel Campbell

    June 2, 2014 at 7:19 am

    It’s a shame that harmless kittens have to be euthanized / killed due to lack of space at this shelter. I thought a shelter protected animals?? A good way to give these animals a chance to live is to give them to loving homes “Free”! I know it costs money to doctor these animal’s and to fix them, house them and feed them. And I know medicine isn’t cheap. But killing a harmless kitten or puppy or any animal that is in good health is just cruel!!! God put animals on this earth for us to love and to protect and in some instances to take care of. How would you feel if you were a harmless kitten or puppy and wanted to live your full life and know you’re gonna be killed cause there is just no more room in our facility and no one paying a fee to give you a good home?? When over crowding happens then animals should be giving to good loving homes free of charge or at least a $10.00 charge where even someone on fixed income could easily pay that. Please don’t kill these harmless babies, give them to good loving homes where they will live out their full lives being happy and free and being loved!!!

  2. Alice king

    June 2, 2014 at 2:26 pm

    Daniel….until people step up to the plate and be responsible owners and get their pets fixed there will always be animals euthanized. The shelter can only house so many animals. Instead of thinking how can they euthanize cats and dogs then be the solution and spread the word on getting your pet fixed, to adopt and not shop and know that a pet is a life long commitment. If those 3 would be taken up then there would be no shelters.

  3. Hmmm

    June 2, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    “How would you feel if you were a harmless kitten or puppy and wanted to live your full life and know you’re gonna be killed cause there is just no more room in our facility and no one paying a fee to give you a good home??”
    Let me assure you that they don’t have the ability to reason, they don’t know they are being euthanized. I think your passion is misplaced. The shelter exists to help as much as possible but funds and space are limited. If you really want to fix the problem you have to go to the irresponsible pet owners. Year after year the same people always have the free kitten signs in their yards. The same people who think kittens are sweet put them outside to fend for themselves without ever visiting a vet. That being said, Daniel, how many are you willing to take? The other big problem is everyone thinks someone else should fix the problem. Unless you volunteer, provide support and work toward a solution it might be best not to judge the heart wrenching decisions those of us left to clean up the bad decisions of others, have to make.

  4. Va Girl

    June 3, 2014 at 8:04 am

    “When over crowding happens then animals should be giving to good loving homes free of charge or at least a $10.00 charge where even someone on fixed income could easily pay that.” >>>> If someone is so hard up that they cannot afford adoption fee, it’s doubtful they can afford the spay/neuter fee either. Or the shots, or proper food for the cat. Pets are not cheap. My cats (2) are neutered, get good food (Evolve…better than One), have had their shots, and get Frontline for ticks and fleas. Just the tick/flea stuff is at least $100 each year which many people cannot pay in addition to the rest. Their food about $200 per year, and then shots/cat litter, etc…..you’re looking at $400-$500 each year to properly care for 2 cats.

  5. Elizabeth

    June 3, 2014 at 10:59 am

    I agree! Anyone on a tight income can hardly afford pets. People who do have pets need to spay and neuter them at the appropriate age to control the population.

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