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Amputation needed to save injured dog’s life

AceBy MELINDA WILLIAMS

melinda@southwesttimes.com

 

Whether it was a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time or just being the wrong breed, a dog rescued Saturday had to undergo lifesaving surgery Monday to have its shattered leg amputated due to a gunshot wound.

“We are not sure what motivated someone toward this senseless act of violence on a member of society’s most vulnerable and voiceless souls,” said Pulaski County Humane Society Executive Director Candice Simmons. She said the blue pit bull, which has been given the name “Ace,” isn’t aggressive.

“When we examined his wound at (Pulaski County Animal Shelter), he just laid in our arms, licked our faces, and wagged his tail,” Simmons said. “He is a sweet, sweet, sweet boy who happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. And probably the wrong breed, too.”

Simmons said many people are afraid of pit bulls because they “erroneously” assume they are all aggressive.

Ace was rushed to Community Animal Clinic after being rescued from a Pulaski residence by Pulaski County Animal Control Saturday morning. Simmons said x-rays showed that the dog’s right front leg bone had been shattered from “what appeared to be a gunshot wound.”

Dr. Jared Morgan at Tipton Ridge Veterinary Medical Center in Pulaski agreed with the finding and determined the leg would have to be amputated for Ace to survive.

The surgery took place Monday and Simmons said Tuesday that Ace was recovering well, even holding up his head to look around.

Simmons said Dr. Morgan was “generous” to offer a reduced rate for the surgery, but it is still “very expensive,” so the humane society is trying to raise money to cover the cost.

Contributions can be made to the humane society via Paypal at pchsva.org or they can be mailed to the organization at P.O. Box 1046, Dublin, VA 24084. Donations also can be dropped off at the animal shelter, 80 Dublin Park Road, Dublin, or be made directly to Tipton Ridge at 1885 Bob White Blvd. Pulaski.

Ace’s progress can be followed at the humane society’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/pchsva.

For questions or more information on donating toward Ace’s surgery, call 674-0089 or email  pchsva@gmail.com

Comments

comments

13 Responses to Amputation needed to save injured dog’s life

  1. Swana coffey

    February 26, 2014 at 3:04 pm

    I saw a post earlier that said the owner took the dog to the vet, they told her if she didn’t have the money he would be put down. So she agreed to put dog down then seen where he was up for adoption so which is the truth?

    • Anonymous

      February 26, 2014 at 7:52 pm

      I believe this story is the truth and here is why. First of all both stories say the dog was picked up by animal control and she went to the vet afterwards, why didn’t she take him to the vet herself? Secondly in the wdbj7 article she said she signed him over to be be put down but then left. Would she have not had to of paid for that, I did when my dog got sick and had to be put down. Her story doesn’t add up completely and it might have been her dog and the county might have taken it from her and then someone else stepped up to save him.

  2. LT

    February 26, 2014 at 5:08 pm

    The Roanoke news reported the matter as the owner took it to the vet and didn’t have the money for surgery so they agreed to put it down. The owner was upset for some reason about the dog being saved (?).
    Please straighten this story out as Pulaski County has a bad reputation in the outside media as it is.
    Thank you so much.

    • concerned citizen

      March 1, 2014 at 5:14 pm

      The only real media problem for our county is that sad, little NASTY reporter from WDBJ 7.He only wants negative stories….look at the only people that he interviews !!

  3. LT

    February 26, 2014 at 5:30 pm

    Wdbj7 6:00 news on Wed…. tonight

  4. Va Girl

    February 27, 2014 at 7:20 am

    Swana, there’s an article on WDBJ7. Apparently she was told by the 1st vet who looked at her dog it would cost “thousands of dollars upfront” to amputate the badly damaged leg. She didn’t have it and was told by the animal control officer her other option was to sign over ownership and the dog would be put down.

    Little did she know that was not to be the case. It was not clear if the county or Humane Society took the dog to another vet who volunteered to do the amputation for free…but now HER DOG is up for adoption and it appears someone else will get to have her pet. I think it’s messed up. She should get the dog back. Why did they tell her pay thousands now or sign this paper to have it put down….then instead (once she left) call around and have it operated on for free?

  5. Sharon Reese

    February 27, 2014 at 8:31 am

    Just pray he gets a good home. So many people think it is ok to abuse.

  6. Lee

    February 27, 2014 at 12:57 pm

    I was at the animal shelter Saturday while the dog was there. The animal control officer brought him there until the vet could see him at noon. I personally think it would be a shame to put this sweet baby down because of a “bum” leg. I think it’s great the humane society is working on getting funds together to pay for the surgery, and if the original owner can provide him a safe home and from what appears to be crazy neighbors, she should get him back, but ONLY if she can provide him a safe and loving home. If she can’t do this, he should go to someone who can properly care for him.

    I am an animal lover, and my husband and I are looking to adopt a dog. There is no other love on this green earth that is as unconditional as a dog’s except for the Good Lord’s. We wouldn’t have anything against adopting a pit or pit mix. Their reputation as a malicious breed is not accurate; any dog, big or small and no matter the breed can be vicious if not trained properly and loved! More humans need to realize that fact.

    • Va Girl

      February 27, 2014 at 10:33 pm

      All of our pets are either from the pound or St. Francis, and one cat found dumped with a bunch of other kittens at our gate (we have the only one we could physically catch). They are all wonderful and sinfully spoiled. Our baby (70 lb. lab/rotty mix) even has her own down pillow! We now live away from neighbors, so the only danger is ticks and the local wildlife.

  7. DH

    February 27, 2014 at 1:12 pm

    Ace should NOT be returned to the so called owner. If it was abuse, he will only likely be abused again.
    Ace should be given a home where he will be loved and well taken care of. AND the new owners should be thoroughly checked out before handing Ace over to them.
    Unfortunately, many people cannot be trusted with animals.

    • Va Girl

      February 27, 2014 at 10:30 pm

      DH, someone in the neighborhood shot the dog. The police are involved in the investigation. The owner didn’t abuse it. It was said to be healthy and very, friendly. But it’s true there are people out there who shouldn’t own animals, yet they have children….go figure?

  8. Concerned

    February 27, 2014 at 2:46 pm

    Does anyone know why/who shot the dog Ace? Is there someone walking around in a neighborhood randomly shooting at dogs in their yards ? When was Ace shot ?
    This should be everyone main concern, I would hate to live in a neighbor were dogs are getting shot and not know what is going on.

    • Va Girl

      February 27, 2014 at 10:28 pm

      I read a neighbor is under investigation.

      Issue seems to be the owner was given 2 options, yet once she signed the papers relinquishing all rights to the dog and allowing it to be put down, a 3rd option suddenly arose. I”m guessing once the dog became property of the county (or Humane Society…not sure how it works) the 3rd option became available. I only hope they allow the family to get their dog back. Apparently she even took photos of the dog at the vet as a “last opportunity” of sorts when saying goodbye thinking it was about to be put down. It’s a strange turn of events, and I won’t pretend to understand. But if I couldn’t afford to have my dog “fixed” at the vet and found they fixed it for free to give it to someone else I’d have questions too.

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