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Time change brings extended daylight, schedule alterations

By MELINDA WILLIAMS

melinda@southwesttimes.com

Come Sunday you’ll have more daylight hours to get your yard in shape for spring, or whatever else you want to do outside.

Daylight Saving Time (DST) begins Sunday, March 10, at 2 a.m., so it’s time to “spring forward” once again. Be sure to move your clocks ahead an hour before going to bed Saturday night to keep from being late on Sunday.

The arrival of DST also means it is time for Pulaski County Public Service Authority’s large item drop site and recycling centers to switch to summer hours. New hours taking effect Monday, March 11, are as follows:

•Pulaski site on Dora Highway – Monday through Friday, 3-7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

•Dublin site on Bagging Plant Road – Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

•Fairlawn site on Mason Street – Monday through Friday, 3-7 p.m., and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

DST is observed in most of the United States and its territories, with the exception of Hawaii, most of Arizona, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

According to Encyclopedia Britannica, Benjamin Franklin first suggested the practice of moving clocks forward in an essay written in 1784.

DST was actually adopted by the United States and several other countries during World War I as a means to extend the hours of daylight and, thus, conserve fuel used for artificial lighting.

DST was observed year-round from 1942 until 1945, due to World War II.

Up until 1986, DST began on the last Sunday in April and ended on the last Sunday in October. However, that year, Congress passed a law beginning DST on the first Sunday in April.

In 2007, it was changed again to the current schedule as part of former President George Bush’s Energy Policy Act.

 

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