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Walking with a cane

A couple of years ago, as I was entering Shoney’s Restaurant in Dublin, a big gust of early March wind tore the door handle from my hand as it sent me crashing to the concrete sidewalk. I will not go through the suffering and inconvenience I went through as a result of that fall, only to say that when I looked down at my left foot, the toe was pointing in the direction of my right heel. I knew this shouldn’t be the case, so I decided immediately that the left hip was badly broken, and of course it was.
After a long stay at the hospital, I was released, and instructed to get a cane to help me walk, which I did, and have been using ever since.
I complained some at first, but in the time since the fall, walking with a cane has its advantages. If one has never been noticed before, a cane will do the trick. Everywhere I went, I was given first place in whatever line of people were waiting. If I had to go inside of a building to get there, some kind man, woman or child offered to help me through the door, crowd, or whatever stood between me and my destination.
One day when entering McDonalds my foot slipped just as I stepped toward the sidewalk. Three employees of the business who were out enjoying a cigarette grabbed me and started me in the right direction.
Recently a lady gave me a ride to and from a church service, and as I walked toward the side walk at my home, I slipped, and down I went. The lady almost had a heart attach, but she had enough strength to pull me to my feet from the slushy snow I was sitting in.
People are always helping. I hear mothers say to their children, “Now you must step aside and let the man wirth the cane come by,” or “hold the door open for him.” Or help him carry his packages.”
Before the accident, I was not aware of the great compassion shown by my fellow people. What a great bunch of individuals these are who live in our area.
These thoughtful deeds are a part of every day I live, and just tend to make me want to live forever. It doesn’t bother me at all that there may be people making the remark, “ The old man with the came did so and so.” I love it, and I doubt if I would get rid of my cane if I was ordered to.

Walking with a cane

A couple of years ago, as I was entering Shoney’s Restaurant in Dublin, a big gust of early March wind tore the door handle from my hand as it sent me crashing to the concrete sidewalk. I will not go through the suffering and inconvenience I went through as a result of that fall, only to say that when I looked down at my left foot, the toe was pointing in the direction of my right heel. I knew this shouldn’t be the case, so I decided immediately that the left hip was badly broken, and of course it was.
After a long stay at the hospital, I was released, and instructed to get a cane to help me walk, which I did, and have been using ever since.
I complained some at first, but in the time since the fall, walking with a cane has its advantages. If one has never been noticed before, a cane will do the trick. Everywhere I went, I was given first place in whatever line of people were waiting. If I had to go inside of a building to get there, some kind man, woman or child offered to help me through the door, crowd, or whatever stood between me and my destination.
One day when entering McDonalds my foot slipped just as I stepped toward the sidewalk. Three employees of the business who were out enjoying a cigarette grabbed me and started me in the right direction.
Recently a lady gave me a ride to and from a church service, and as I walked toward the side walk at my home, I slipped, and down I went. The lady almost had a heart attach, but she had enough strength to pull me to my feet from the slushy snow I was sitting in.
People are always helping. I hear mothers say to their children, “Now you must step aside and let the man wirth the cane come by,” or “hold the door open for him.” Or help him carry his packages.”
Before the accident, I was not aware of the great compassion shown by my fellow people. What a great bunch of individuals these are who live in our area.
These thoughtful deeds are a part of every day I live, and just tend to make me want to live forever. It doesn’t bother me at all that there may be people making the remark, “ The old man with the came did so and so.” I love it, and I doubt if I would get rid of my cane if I was ordered to.