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Valentine Sweethearts

DRAPER — When they were younger, Jim and Peggy Lefler enjoyed life to the fullest.
She worked and he trained Tennessee show horses. And when their schedules permitted, they both went on road shows to see the sights and to enjoy the fellowship of those they met on their trips.
But 12 years ago, Peggy suffered two strokes, resulting from a serious heart operation. She is now confined in a wheel chair and has a slight speech impediment. Jim has become her constant care giver. “She’s still got a good memory, but she can’t walk,” Jim said.
Because Jim also has developed a health condition, a nurse has to be assigned for their care five days a week. Jim is ambulatory but needs an oxygen tank at night while sleeping.
Today, both retired and disabled, they while away their time in a small farm house nestled in the valley in the southern part of Draper. The old, quaint, 800-square-foot structure surrounded by tall pine trees, has three bedrooms, one bath, living room and kitchen. It is flanked by a creek on one side and by a river on the other. From a distance it makes a picture postcard.
While Jim, 75, likes to watch television on a small flat panel set in the living room, Peggy, 73, prefers to look out the window or sit out on the porch, weather permitting, to watch the wildlife that roam around their 55-acre spread.
The property is fenced in and gated with only a small narrow path that leads from the main highway to the farm house.
Jim says they owned 91 acres at one time but sold some of it.
“Peggy could sit by the window for hours, just enjoying the sights,” volunteered their nurse, who preferred to be called Mary. She added that Peggy smiles and claps her hands in delight when she sees a wild turkey, a deer, a boar or a ground hog.
Mary said that Peggy has a keen sense of humor and laughs at the slightest provocation. At one time, when Mary was taking off her socks, Peggy exclaimed, “Your feet stink!” And then burst out laughing. “She kids me all the time,” Mary added.
Jim says they could also watch beavers and otters cavorting in the river.
The only drawback in their pristine paradise is when there is an electric power outage. “It goes out sometimes for three days,” he said. “Need to get me a generator someday.”
Jim met Peggy through Jim’s sister and it was love at first sight, both claim. They’ve been married for 49 years andhave a son, Mark, and a daughter they, Angie.
In all the years they’ve been married, Jim said there was never a harsh word exchanged between them. He decries that many couples today seek a divorce or separation when things don’t go right in their lives for the first time. “They can work things out by themselves.”
The secret to the Leflers long and happy marriage? “Being good to each other!” Peggy exclaimed.
For Valentine, Jim says that their kids might come over and take them out to dinner. If not, they still have each other for Valentine’s Day.

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Valentine Sweethearts

DRAPER — When they were younger, Jim and Peggy Lefler enjoyed life to the fullest.
She worked and he trained Tennessee show horses. And when their schedules permitted, they both went on road shows to see the sights and to enjoy the fellowship of those they met on their trips.
But 12 years ago, Peggy suffered two strokes, resulting from a serious heart operation. She is now confined in a wheel chair and has a slight speech impediment. Jim has become her constant care giver. “She’s still got a good memory, but she can’t walk,” Jim said.
Because Jim also has developed a health condition, a nurse has to be assigned for their care five days a week. Jim is ambulatory but needs an oxygen tank at night while sleeping.
Today, both retired and disabled, they while away their time in a small farm house nestled in the valley in the southern part of Draper. The old, quaint, 800-square-foot structure surrounded by tall pine trees, has three bedrooms, one bath, living room and kitchen. It is flanked by a creek on one side and by a river on the other. From a distance it makes a picture postcard.
While Jim, 75, likes to watch television on a small flat panel set in the living room, Peggy, 73, prefers to look out the window or sit out on the porch, weather permitting, to watch the wildlife that roam around their 55-acre spread.
The property is fenced in and gated with only a small narrow path that leads from the main highway to the farm house.
Jim says they owned 91 acres at one time but sold some of it.
“Peggy could sit by the window for hours, just enjoying the sights,” volunteered their nurse, who preferred to be called Mary. She added that Peggy smiles and claps her hands in delight when she sees a wild turkey, a deer, a boar or a ground hog.
Mary said that Peggy has a keen sense of humor and laughs at the slightest provocation. At one time, when Mary was taking off her socks, Peggy exclaimed, “Your feet stink!” And then burst out laughing. “She kids me all the time,” Mary added.
Jim says they could also watch beavers and otters cavorting in the river.
The only drawback in their pristine paradise is when there is an electric power outage. “It goes out sometimes for three days,” he said. “Need to get me a generator someday.”
Jim met Peggy through Jim’s sister and it was love at first sight, both claim. They’ve been married for 49 years andhave a son, Mark, and a daughter they, Angie.
In all the years they’ve been married, Jim said there was never a harsh word exchanged between them. He decries that many couples today seek a divorce or separation when things don’t go right in their lives for the first time. “They can work things out by themselves.”
The secret to the Leflers long and happy marriage? “Being good to each other!” Peggy exclaimed.
For Valentine, Jim says that their kids might come over and take them out to dinner. If not, they still have each other for Valentine’s Day.

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