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Second building collapses

His family has been making burial vaults out of the same building for more than 60 years, but a roof collapse caused by snow buildup may be the Achilles hill that closes Virginia Vault Services off Robinson Tract Road.
Garland Leeson said it is disheartening to see the roof collapsed on a building his father constructed for vault storage many years ago. He didn’t have the storage building insured, but a boom or crane truck that was parked just inside the building was insured.
Nonetheless, at the age of 62 and having had bypass surgery, Leeson said this setback may be a sign it’s time to retire.
Leeson’s father started Virginia Vault Services in 1946. It is located in several buildings to the back of the family home place at the intersection of Hilton’s Village Loop Road. Although the block building in which the vaults are manufactured was not damaged, a large shed structure used for storage collapsed Friday under the weight of what Leeson described as about two feet of snow.
He said he was surprised by the collapse of the approximately 30-foot by 80-foot building because the building was “well constructed” by his father out of “solid oak. You can’t even drive a nail in that stuff.”
He doesn’t have an estimate for the damage yet.
“It’s got me shut down right now,” he said of the collapse. “If I had a funeral right now I wouldn’t be able to do it,” he added.
Besides making and delivering the vaults, Leeson said his business also handles other aspects of the burial, if requested, such as the tent and chairs, and opening and closing of the grave.
He estimated about half of the 30 vault lids stored in the structure were “busted’ by the collapsing roof. He said it appears the chairs, tents and other items are okay, but he is afraid to walk into the structure to see what was damaged.
“It’s sad,” he said, noting that it may be the end of the business because he doesn’t know whether his customers will stick with him over the weeks he will have to be shut down.
He took over the business in 1976 when his father and uncle retired. He has one employee.
“We’ve done right good with it over the years, but this might be the Achilles hill for us,” he added.
However, with a high wind warning looming, Leeson said Tuesday evening he is more concerned about a piece of tin from the collapsing roof being ripped from the building and damaging someone else’s property or injuring someone.

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Second building collapses

His family has been making burial vaults out of the same building for more than 60 years, but a roof collapse caused by snow buildup may be the Achilles hill that closes Virginia Vault Services off Robinson Tract Road.
Garland Leeson said it is disheartening to see the roof collapsed on a building his father constructed for vault storage many years ago. He didn’t have the storage building insured, but a boom or crane truck that was parked just inside the building was insured.
Nonetheless, at the age of 62 and having had bypass surgery, Leeson said this setback may be a sign it’s time to retire.
Leeson’s father started Virginia Vault Services in 1946. It is located in several buildings to the back of the family home place at the intersection of Hilton’s Village Loop Road. Although the block building in which the vaults are manufactured was not damaged, a large shed structure used for storage collapsed Friday under the weight of what Leeson described as about two feet of snow.
He said he was surprised by the collapse of the approximately 30-foot by 80-foot building because the building was “well constructed” by his father out of “solid oak. You can’t even drive a nail in that stuff.”
He doesn’t have an estimate for the damage yet.
“It’s got me shut down right now,” he said of the collapse. “If I had a funeral right now I wouldn’t be able to do it,” he added.
Besides making and delivering the vaults, Leeson said his business also handles other aspects of the burial, if requested, such as the tent and chairs, and opening and closing of the grave.
He estimated about half of the 30 vault lids stored in the structure were “busted’ by the collapsing roof. He said it appears the chairs, tents and other items are okay, but he is afraid to walk into the structure to see what was damaged.
“It’s sad,” he said, noting that it may be the end of the business because he doesn’t know whether his customers will stick with him over the weeks he will have to be shut down.
He took over the business in 1976 when his father and uncle retired. He has one employee.
“We’ve done right good with it over the years, but this might be the Achilles hill for us,” he added.
However, with a high wind warning looming, Leeson said Tuesday evening he is more concerned about a piece of tin from the collapsing roof being ripped from the building and damaging someone else’s property or injuring someone.

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