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Wastewater Authority to discuss rebates

With the regional waster water treatment plant continuing to experience record flows during the first quarter of its fiscal year, the executive director says he expects to discuss rebates for the localities it serves next month.
Clarke Wallcraft, executive director for Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, said he will evaluate the authority’s financial position to determine whether rebates are feasible after completing February’s billing cycle.
Although the plant has been experiencing record flows, he said the revenue may just now be leveling out from the years the authority dipped into its reserves to cover decreased revenues due to a “historical” drought. The record flows are due to this winter’s heavy snow and an abundance of rain over the past year.
Wallcraft said the authority doesn’t want to be a “cash cow” and not try to assist jurisdictions that are now being hit with higher bills as a result of heavy flows.
Jurisdictions served by Pepper’s Ferry are billed based on the amount of waster and storm runoff water they pump into the facility. So, when precipitation is high the jurisdictions’ sewer funds take a hit financially. Likewise, when there is a drought, the authority’s revenue stream falls off.
Whether rebates are authorized will be up to the Pepper’s Ferry Board of Directors, which is made up of representatives from each of the jurisdictions it serves.
Radford City representative Robert Asbury pointed out that the authority needs to be sure that it recovers the reserve revenue it paid out during the drought before approving rebates. He noted that the authority covered the lost revenue with reserves rather than “hiking rates during the drought.
“Now we’re finally building some (reserves) up again,” he said.
Wallcraft said the authority is still about a quarter million dollars below what it took from reserves, but “when we include this month, we may be close to being equal.”
Wallcraft said Thursday that December’s net income was “huge” – more than $200,000 – as a result of high flows. Just one quarter into its fiscal year, its net income stands at $483,000, he said.
According to Pepper’s Ferry Superintendent Mac McCutchan, the average flow for the month of January was seven million gallons per day (MGD). The average flow on which jurisdictions are billed is about 3.6 MGD.
On Jan. 26, he said, the flow reached 16 MGD.
“Flows of that magnitude have not entered the plan since we opened (in February 1987),” McCutchan added.

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Wastewater Authority to discuss rebates

With the regional waster water treatment plant continuing to experience record flows during the first quarter of its fiscal year, the executive director says he expects to discuss rebates for the localities it serves next month.
Clarke Wallcraft, executive director for Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, said he will evaluate the authority’s financial position to determine whether rebates are feasible after completing February’s billing cycle.
Although the plant has been experiencing record flows, he said the revenue may just now be leveling out from the years the authority dipped into its reserves to cover decreased revenues due to a “historical” drought. The record flows are due to this winter’s heavy snow and an abundance of rain over the past year.
Wallcraft said the authority doesn’t want to be a “cash cow” and not try to assist jurisdictions that are now being hit with higher bills as a result of heavy flows.
Jurisdictions served by Pepper’s Ferry are billed based on the amount of waster and storm runoff water they pump into the facility. So, when precipitation is high the jurisdictions’ sewer funds take a hit financially. Likewise, when there is a drought, the authority’s revenue stream falls off.
Whether rebates are authorized will be up to the Pepper’s Ferry Board of Directors, which is made up of representatives from each of the jurisdictions it serves.
Radford City representative Robert Asbury pointed out that the authority needs to be sure that it recovers the reserve revenue it paid out during the drought before approving rebates. He noted that the authority covered the lost revenue with reserves rather than “hiking rates during the drought.
“Now we’re finally building some (reserves) up again,” he said.
Wallcraft said the authority is still about a quarter million dollars below what it took from reserves, but “when we include this month, we may be close to being equal.”
Wallcraft said Thursday that December’s net income was “huge” – more than $200,000 – as a result of high flows. Just one quarter into its fiscal year, its net income stands at $483,000, he said.
According to Pepper’s Ferry Superintendent Mac McCutchan, the average flow for the month of January was seven million gallons per day (MGD). The average flow on which jurisdictions are billed is about 3.6 MGD.
On Jan. 26, he said, the flow reached 16 MGD.
“Flows of that magnitude have not entered the plan since we opened (in February 1987),” McCutchan added.

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