Duncan Suzuki

Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

VDOT says safety first

Despite several major snowstorms, Virginia Department of Transportation is still operating within its snow removal budget, says Resident Engineer David Clarke.
He didn’t have official figures for the amount of money spent on the storms to date. However, Clarke said, “we’ve not exhausted it yet.”
He said funds spent on snow removal can be misleading anyway because the money allocated within that budget for personnel and equipment would have been spent within another budget category regardless of the snow. He explained that the department would be paying its employees to do something else if they weren’t removing snow from the roads.
The only true impact snow has on the department’s budget is in money spent for chemicals to treat the roads and on the equipment used to clear roads.
The local residency was allocated about $955,000 for snow removal in its current budget. Even if the rest of the winter continues to be snow-plagued and all of the funds are expended before the end of the season, Clarke says roads will continue to be cleared because safety of motorists is a priority, he added.
If the snow removal budget is fully expended, funds to cover the rest of the season will be transferred from the highway maintenance program. Unfortunately, that means fewer paving projects.
“If we go into maintenance (budget), it will probably affect our overlay paving (repaving of already paved roads) budget. We have to fix potholes, but we don’t necessarily have to do overlay,” he said.
Of course, the bad thing about wet, cold winters is that it causes “winter breakup” and leaves VDOT with a lot of roads that are in need of repairs.
“The really cold weather we had in January will shop up later on,” with damage to the pavement, he added.
Luckily, interstate snow removal does not come out of the local office’s budget, so that helps stretch the money.
Regardless, Clarke said he hasn’t tried to make any adjustments to the budget yet to make additional money available for snow removal if it is needed.
“We’ll wait and see what February is like,” he said.

Comments

comments

VDOT says safety first

Despite several major snowstorms, Virginia Department of Transportation is still operating within its snow removal budget, says Resident Engineer David Clarke.
He didn’t have official figures for the amount of money spent on the storms to date. However, Clarke said, “we’ve not exhausted it yet.”
He said funds spent on snow removal can be misleading anyway because the money allocated within that budget for personnel and equipment would have been spent within another budget category regardless of the snow. He explained that the department would be paying its employees to do something else if they weren’t removing snow from the roads.
The only true impact snow has on the department’s budget is in money spent for chemicals to treat the roads and on the equipment used to clear roads.
The local residency was allocated about $955,000 for snow removal in its current budget. Even if the rest of the winter continues to be snow-plagued and all of the funds are expended before the end of the season, Clarke says roads will continue to be cleared because safety of motorists is a priority, he added.
If the snow removal budget is fully expended, funds to cover the rest of the season will be transferred from the highway maintenance program. Unfortunately, that means fewer paving projects.
“If we go into maintenance (budget), it will probably affect our overlay paving (repaving of already paved roads) budget. We have to fix potholes, but we don’t necessarily have to do overlay,” he said.
Of course, the bad thing about wet, cold winters is that it causes “winter breakup” and leaves VDOT with a lot of roads that are in need of repairs.
“The really cold weather we had in January will shop up later on,” with damage to the pavement, he added.
Luckily, interstate snow removal does not come out of the local office’s budget, so that helps stretch the money.
Regardless, Clarke said he hasn’t tried to make any adjustments to the budget yet to make additional money available for snow removal if it is needed.
“We’ll wait and see what February is like,” he said.

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login