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Town will query downtown area merchants

Merchants with businesses along Main and Third Streets from the “Y” intersection at Duncan Street to Jefferson Avenue will soon have a chance to provide input on the prospect of changing to two-way traffic on Main Street.
Pulaski Town County Tuesday night authorized two staff to personally take surveys to each merchant in that territory so council can gauge the merchants’ opinions on changing the traffic flow downtown.
If a building in the territory is empty, Councilman Morgan Welker suggested the survey be mailed to the building’s owner because the traffic change could potentially affect future use or sale of the build.
Once the merchant survey is completed, a shorter survey will be sent out to town citizens in water and sewer bills.
Welker questioned whether the public would take time to answer the longer survey provided to merchants.
The merchant survey includes nine questions with a five-point ranking system for each answer.
The first question asks whether the merchant’s business is sufficiently visible to the public with the current one-way traffic pattern and for a response as to why it is or why it isn’t. The respondent has five choices for answering with “1” being “yes, visible now” and “5” being “no, not visible now.”
Other questions include:
n Do you think your business or office would be easier for the public to locate if traffic traveled in both directions? Why or Why not?
n Do you see an economic benefit if traffic could travel directly to our business or office from the I-81 or U.S. 11 without circling the block? Why or Why not?
n Would you be willing to sacrifice parking spaces near intersections in exchange for better accessibility and visibility?
n What percentage of your business depends on “regular customers?” What percentage depends on visitors?
n Do you believe changing the traffic pattern downtown would increase foot traffic downtown?
n Do you feel better way-faring signage (directions to key places) would be a better solution than changing the traffic pattern?
n What option (listed below) do you believe taxpayers should support in changing the existing downtown traffic pattern?
n Would money spent on signage or changing the traffic pattern provide a good return on the investment?
Council provides five options for those taking the survey to consider:
n Increased directional signage and keeping one-way traffic, estimated cost $8,000-$10,000.
n Two-way traffic on Main Street between Washington and Jefferson, estimated cost $60,000 for two signals.
n Two-way traffic on Main and Third streets between Washington and Jefferson, estimated cost $90,000.
n All traffic two-way except from the “Y” intersection to Madison Avenue, estimated cost $90,000.
n Two-way traffic necessitating the revision of the “Y” intersection , estimated cost $300,000 to $700,000.

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Town will query downtown area merchants

Merchants with businesses along Main and Third Streets from the “Y” intersection at Duncan Street to Jefferson Avenue will soon have a chance to provide input on the prospect of changing to two-way traffic on Main Street.
Pulaski Town County Tuesday night authorized two staff to personally take surveys to each merchant in that territory so council can gauge the merchants’ opinions on changing the traffic flow downtown.
If a building in the territory is empty, Councilman Morgan Welker suggested the survey be mailed to the building’s owner because the traffic change could potentially affect future use or sale of the build.
Once the merchant survey is completed, a shorter survey will be sent out to town citizens in water and sewer bills.
Welker questioned whether the public would take time to answer the longer survey provided to merchants.
The merchant survey includes nine questions with a five-point ranking system for each answer.
The first question asks whether the merchant’s business is sufficiently visible to the public with the current one-way traffic pattern and for a response as to why it is or why it isn’t. The respondent has five choices for answering with “1” being “yes, visible now” and “5” being “no, not visible now.”
Other questions include:
n Do you think your business or office would be easier for the public to locate if traffic traveled in both directions? Why or Why not?
n Do you see an economic benefit if traffic could travel directly to our business or office from the I-81 or U.S. 11 without circling the block? Why or Why not?
n Would you be willing to sacrifice parking spaces near intersections in exchange for better accessibility and visibility?
n What percentage of your business depends on “regular customers?” What percentage depends on visitors?
n Do you believe changing the traffic pattern downtown would increase foot traffic downtown?
n Do you feel better way-faring signage (directions to key places) would be a better solution than changing the traffic pattern?
n What option (listed below) do you believe taxpayers should support in changing the existing downtown traffic pattern?
n Would money spent on signage or changing the traffic pattern provide a good return on the investment?
Council provides five options for those taking the survey to consider:
n Increased directional signage and keeping one-way traffic, estimated cost $8,000-$10,000.
n Two-way traffic on Main Street between Washington and Jefferson, estimated cost $60,000 for two signals.
n Two-way traffic on Main and Third streets between Washington and Jefferson, estimated cost $90,000.
n All traffic two-way except from the “Y” intersection to Madison Avenue, estimated cost $90,000.
n Two-way traffic necessitating the revision of the “Y” intersection , estimated cost $300,000 to $700,000.

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