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Called to Action

While most of us were putting the finishing touches on our Christmas plans, Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell was busy making his way through knee-deep snow in the mountains of West Virginia.
Worrell, a 30-year senior technician with American Electric Power, was among local power company employees dispatched to West Virginia and far southwestern Virginia after as much as two feet of snow knocked out power to nearly a quarter-million customers Friday, Dec. 18.
“At the peak there were, unofficially, about 225,000 (customers) without power,” Worrell estimated.
He said he was told to report to work at 7 a.m. Dec. 19 so the storm damage could be assessed and the areas in need of most help could be pinpointed.
Since Pulaski County and the immediate area were fortunate to have escaped serious power damage, Worrell said he was sent to West Virginia on Sunday, Dec. 20. He ended up in Bradshaw in the southwestern part of the state.
His job was to immediately beginning assessing each of the company’s utility poles for damage.
In many cases this entailed trekking through the mountains on foot.
Bradshaw received about 18 inches of snow during the storm, but Worrell said the snow was above his knees in some parts of the mountains.

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Called to Action

While most of us were putting the finishing touches on our Christmas plans, Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell was busy making his way through knee-deep snow in the mountains of West Virginia.
Worrell, a 30-year senior technician with American Electric Power, was among local power company employees dispatched to West Virginia and far southwestern Virginia after as much as two feet of snow knocked out power to nearly a quarter-million customers Friday, Dec. 18.
“At the peak there were, unofficially, about 225,000 (customers) without power,” Worrell estimated.
He said he was told to report to work at 7 a.m. Dec. 19 so the storm damage could be assessed and the areas in need of most help could be pinpointed.
Since Pulaski County and the immediate area were fortunate to have escaped serious power damage, Worrell said he was sent to West Virginia on Sunday, Dec. 20. He ended up in Bradshaw in the southwestern part of the state.
His job was to immediately beginning assessing each of the company’s utility poles for damage.
In many cases this entailed trekking through the mountains on foot.
Bradshaw received about 18 inches of snow during the storm, but Worrell said the snow was above his knees in some parts of the mountains.

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