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Free Clinic meets needs of uninsured

On conclusion of the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2009, the Free Clinic of Pulaski County provided primary healthcare to 934 citizens of Pulaski County who lacked health insurance or who otherwise could not afford to pay for medical care on their own. These residents were assisted at 1,761 patient visits in open and by appointment clinics. More than 6,500 30-day prescriptions were provided to treat acute and chronic conditions. More than 900 hours were donated by volunteering physicians, nurses and others who help at each clinic. Gary Elander, Executive Director, has been compiling information for the last year.
Elander said that the Free Clinic was originally created in 1982 by “community leaders who saw a need for care for people who worked jobs without health benefits or were in transition between jobs but not eligible for Medicare or Medicaid.” The Free Clinic is housed in the Philip Sadler Center on North Jefferson Street. Mr. Sadler was a founding father of the clinic. The clinic resides in a building provided by the First Presbyterian Church as a service to the community.
For many years the Free Clinic operated with just one clinic weekly on Thursday evenings. Persons would walk in, be screened to determine eligibility, and then be seen by volunteer medical staff. Area physicians and nurses would provide initial treatment and follow-up appointments would occur as needed. Dedicated local physicians and nurses continue to donate their time in serving the uninsured and “working poor” in Pulaski County.
The Free Clinic works with other health care providers to access hospital, laboratory and specialty services. For example, the Free Clinic referred patients for appointments at more than a dozen specialties on 160 occasions. Pulaski Community Hospital provided more than $131,000 in services to Free Clinic patients. Free Clinic medical personnel referred patients to the University of Virginia Medical Center on 69 occasions.
The Free Clinic conducts a Thursday evening “open” clinic for potential new patients. Patients are screened to determine if they already have health insurance and whether they meet income criteria. Presently, patients without insurance may be seen if income does not exceed 130% of the Federal Poverty Guideline. Appointment clinics are available thereafter on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Since January 2005, the Free Clinic has hosted the Via College of Osteopathic Medicine that conducts clinics every other week during the year. Since 2005 there have been six physicians and scores of students who have participated in the event.

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Free Clinic meets needs of uninsured

On conclusion of the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2009, the Free Clinic of Pulaski County provided primary healthcare to 934 citizens of Pulaski County who lacked health insurance or who otherwise could not afford to pay for medical care on their own. These residents were assisted at 1,761 patient visits in open and by appointment clinics. More than 6,500 30-day prescriptions were provided to treat acute and chronic conditions. More than 900 hours were donated by volunteering physicians, nurses and others who help at each clinic. Gary Elander, Executive Director, has been compiling information for the last year.
Elander said that the Free Clinic was originally created in 1982 by “community leaders who saw a need for care for people who worked jobs without health benefits or were in transition between jobs but not eligible for Medicare or Medicaid.” The Free Clinic is housed in the Philip Sadler Center on North Jefferson Street. Mr. Sadler was a founding father of the clinic. The clinic resides in a building provided by the First Presbyterian Church as a service to the community.
For many years the Free Clinic operated with just one clinic weekly on Thursday evenings. Persons would walk in, be screened to determine eligibility, and then be seen by volunteer medical staff. Area physicians and nurses would provide initial treatment and follow-up appointments would occur as needed. Dedicated local physicians and nurses continue to donate their time in serving the uninsured and “working poor” in Pulaski County.
The Free Clinic works with other health care providers to access hospital, laboratory and specialty services. For example, the Free Clinic referred patients for appointments at more than a dozen specialties on 160 occasions. Pulaski Community Hospital provided more than $131,000 in services to Free Clinic patients. Free Clinic medical personnel referred patients to the University of Virginia Medical Center on 69 occasions.
The Free Clinic conducts a Thursday evening “open” clinic for potential new patients. Patients are screened to determine if they already have health insurance and whether they meet income criteria. Presently, patients without insurance may be seen if income does not exceed 130% of the Federal Poverty Guideline. Appointment clinics are available thereafter on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Since January 2005, the Free Clinic has hosted the Via College of Osteopathic Medicine that conducts clinics every other week during the year. Since 2005 there have been six physicians and scores of students who have participated in the event.

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