Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

High wind gusts to 50 mph topple trees, power lines

High winds that gusted up to 50 miles per hour or more downed trees and knocked out power to parts of Pulaski County and the New River Valley Wednesday.
The wind advisory continues until 6 p.m. today, with west winds of 15 to 30 miles per hour expected to include gusts of 45 to 50 miles per hour. The strongest winds were expected to occur into early afternoon and in the areas of highest elevation.
According to Appalachian Power Company, more than 100,000 people were without power in the company’s Southwest Virginia and Tennessee service area by Wednesday afternoon. As of the last update at 9 p.m. Wednesday, 30,000 in the service area remained without power, with 1,500 of those being in Pulaski County.
Appalachian reported that power line crews and contractors would have power restored as quickly as possible, but with gusty winds continuing, the number of reported outages also is continuing.
In the meantime, Appalachian advises residents to never touch a downed utility wire even if it appears to be harmless. Since it is often difficult to distinguish between cable, telephone and power lines, the company stresses that all downed lines should be considered energized and dangerous.
Items in contact with utility lines, such as trees, fences or puddles of water, also should be avoided because the electricity could be conducted to an individual through the item.
Appalachian also asks customers affected by a power outage to turn off all lights and appliances – including heating or air conditioning systems – to prevent circuits from overloading as power is restored.

Comments

comments

High wind gusts to 50 mph topple trees, power lines

High winds that gusted up to 50 miles per hour or more downed trees and knocked out power to parts of Pulaski County and the New River Valley Wednesday.
The wind advisory continues until 6 p.m. today, with west winds of 15 to 30 miles per hour expected to include gusts of 45 to 50 miles per hour. The strongest winds were expected to occur into early afternoon and in the areas of highest elevation.
According to Appalachian Power Company, more than 100,000 people were without power in the company’s Southwest Virginia and Tennessee service area by Wednesday afternoon. As of the last update at 9 p.m. Wednesday, 30,000 in the service area remained without power, with 1,500 of those being in Pulaski County.
Appalachian reported that power line crews and contractors would have power restored as quickly as possible, but with gusty winds continuing, the number of reported outages also is continuing.
In the meantime, Appalachian advises residents to never touch a downed utility wire even if it appears to be harmless. Since it is often difficult to distinguish between cable, telephone and power lines, the company stresses that all downed lines should be considered energized and dangerous.
Items in contact with utility lines, such as trees, fences or puddles of water, also should be avoided because the electricity could be conducted to an individual through the item.
Appalachian also asks customers affected by a power outage to turn off all lights and appliances – including heating or air conditioning systems – to prevent circuits from overloading as power is restored.

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login