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Trail will cost town $6,000

Turning the old iron train trestle in Southeast Pulaski into a walking and biking trail will cost the town about $6,000
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley said around $1,000 in survey costs and about $2,000 in appraisal costs can be applied to the town’s required match of $6,200 for the project.
“I think it’ll be a good project for the town,” Hawley told members of town council recently. “It’ll be a neat spot for people to go.”
He said the money for the project hasn’t been budgeted for this fiscal year, “but I think we can find a way to fund it.”
The town recently found out its five years of efforts to obtain the property from Norfolk Southern Railway would finally pay off.
The company will donate the trestle and 1.215 acres to the town in exchange for the town paying to update an appraisal and accepting the property “as is.”
Councilman Larry Clevinger II suggested the town might want to have a structural integrity study performed on the bridge to make sure it is safe to use. He said it appears to be sound, but he noticed the footings are wood rather than stone.
“I’ve never seen one built like that,” he said. “It looks solid.”
Clevinger said he noticed that no maintenance has been performed on the bridge since 1973, based upon railroad markings on the structure.Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said he is “excited” about the trail, noting that he used to use the bridge years ago going to a from school.
If the structure is solid enough, Hawley said it is possible some smaller emergency vehicles such as ambulances might be able to use it. Pulaski has been working with Norfolk Southern since 2004 to obtain the bridge for pedestrians and bicyclists.
The town has a $31,000 grant from Virginia Department of Transportation to fund building of the trail, which would link First Street to the area near the Main/Third Street area near Madison Avenue. The trail would allow pedestrians and people on bicycles to move between the northeast and southeast sections of town without having to go to Washington Avenue.
A number of environmental studies will be required before construction can begin, so it could be spring before work can begin, Hawley said.

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Trail will cost town $6,000

Turning the old iron train trestle in Southeast Pulaski into a walking and biking trail will cost the town about $6,000
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley said around $1,000 in survey costs and about $2,000 in appraisal costs can be applied to the town’s required match of $6,200 for the project.
“I think it’ll be a good project for the town,” Hawley told members of town council recently. “It’ll be a neat spot for people to go.”
He said the money for the project hasn’t been budgeted for this fiscal year, “but I think we can find a way to fund it.”
The town recently found out its five years of efforts to obtain the property from Norfolk Southern Railway would finally pay off.
The company will donate the trestle and 1.215 acres to the town in exchange for the town paying to update an appraisal and accepting the property “as is.”
Councilman Larry Clevinger II suggested the town might want to have a structural integrity study performed on the bridge to make sure it is safe to use. He said it appears to be sound, but he noticed the footings are wood rather than stone.
“I’ve never seen one built like that,” he said. “It looks solid.”
Clevinger said he noticed that no maintenance has been performed on the bridge since 1973, based upon railroad markings on the structure.Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said he is “excited” about the trail, noting that he used to use the bridge years ago going to a from school.
If the structure is solid enough, Hawley said it is possible some smaller emergency vehicles such as ambulances might be able to use it. Pulaski has been working with Norfolk Southern since 2004 to obtain the bridge for pedestrians and bicyclists.
The town has a $31,000 grant from Virginia Department of Transportation to fund building of the trail, which would link First Street to the area near the Main/Third Street area near Madison Avenue. The trail would allow pedestrians and people on bicycles to move between the northeast and southeast sections of town without having to go to Washington Avenue.
A number of environmental studies will be required before construction can begin, so it could be spring before work can begin, Hawley said.

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