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Ovarian cancer victim finds comfort in hope, prayer and a positive outlook

RADFORD — Six-year old Molly Cox, sitting in her grandmother’s lap turns her face to look lovingly into the eyes of the woman holding her, and says, “Don’t you worry, Nana. We’ll find a cure.”
The woman smiles and nods her head, and before she can say anything, her other grandchildren, Molly’s sisters; Mikayla, 10, and Meagan, 6, utter in unison, “We love you, we love you very much, Nana.”
‘Nana’ is Janet Rodgers, 65, of Radford. Two months ago, she learned that she has ovarian cancer. But from her beaming face and the twinkle in her eyes, no would suspect that there was anything wrong with her. From the moment she greeted me at her door, she maintained an upbeat demeanor.
Janet Rodgers was a registered nurse at Virginia Tech for more than 33 years before she retired. When she experienced some unpleasant symptoms last August, she immediately sought medical help. Some symptoms of ovarian cancer may include indigestion, heartburn, nausea, gas, abdominal swelling or discomfort, pelvic pain or cramping. “That’s why I thought there wasn’t anything to it at first,” she said, referring to her symptoms, “Until they told me I had ovarian cancer. Then I was in shock.”
The depressing and unexpected blow to the family quickly circulated among friends and relatives alike. “I was very sad,” was Molly’s said, when asked how she felt when she was told of Grandma’s condition. “But we’re hoping and praying for the best,” said Meagan. “So, we come and visit Nana at least once a week,” Mikayla added.
Janet Rodgers had her surgery and is now taking chemotherapy.
While awaiting her prognosis, friends and neighbors quickly rallied support. The girls created posters for their Nana and participated in the Run 4 Her event held at Bisset Park in Radford on Sept. 19, which was partly sponsored by the Carilion New River Valley Medical Center.
Included in the event was a 5K run, a 2-mile walk and the children’s 100-yard dash. The Cox’s children, Mikayla, Meagan and Molly walked the entire 2 miles with posters in hand, in support of their Nana. Over $2,000 was raised for the event. Support from churches, former co-workers and friends, also poured in, in the form of personal visits, food baskets and phone calls. A former associate, Judy Madigan, also a nurse at VT, made a special quilt containing pictures of the children.
“The walk was not just for me,” Janet Rodgers stipulated. “It was for all the women in the area with ovarian cancer.”
Through CaringBridge.org, a website specially created for families and friends “to connect when health matters most,” Janet Rodgers created her own website and has received more than 3,000 hits since August. “It also got 842 messages that people posted on her site,” added Tasha Cox, the children’s mother, Janet’s daughter-in-law, who is married to her son, Michael Cox. “These people just want to give her encouragement and also share their experiences as cancer victims,” Tasha added.
Janet resides with her husband Beale Rodger in Radford.

For now, the immediate and extended families are trying to live by their own philosophy: “Live today to the fullest, because tomorrow it not promised.”

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Ovarian cancer victim finds comfort in hope, prayer and a positive outlook

RADFORD — Six-year old Molly Cox, sitting in her grandmother’s lap turns her face to look lovingly into the eyes of the woman holding her, and says, “Don’t you worry, Nana. We’ll find a cure.”
The woman smiles and nods her head, and before she can say anything, her other grandchildren, Molly’s sisters; Mikayla, 10, and Meagan, 6, utter in unison, “We love you, we love you very much, Nana.”
‘Nana’ is Janet Rodgers, 65, of Radford. Two months ago, she learned that she has ovarian cancer. But from her beaming face and the twinkle in her eyes, no would suspect that there was anything wrong with her. From the moment she greeted me at her door, she maintained an upbeat demeanor.
Janet Rodgers was a registered nurse at Virginia Tech for more than 33 years before she retired. When she experienced some unpleasant symptoms last August, she immediately sought medical help. Some symptoms of ovarian cancer may include indigestion, heartburn, nausea, gas, abdominal swelling or discomfort, pelvic pain or cramping. “That’s why I thought there wasn’t anything to it at first,” she said, referring to her symptoms, “Until they told me I had ovarian cancer. Then I was in shock.”
The depressing and unexpected blow to the family quickly circulated among friends and relatives alike. “I was very sad,” was Molly’s said, when asked how she felt when she was told of Grandma’s condition. “But we’re hoping and praying for the best,” said Meagan. “So, we come and visit Nana at least once a week,” Mikayla added.
Janet Rodgers had her surgery and is now taking chemotherapy.
While awaiting her prognosis, friends and neighbors quickly rallied support. The girls created posters for their Nana and participated in the Run 4 Her event held at Bisset Park in Radford on Sept. 19, which was partly sponsored by the Carilion New River Valley Medical Center.
Included in the event was a 5K run, a 2-mile walk and the children’s 100-yard dash. The Cox’s children, Mikayla, Meagan and Molly walked the entire 2 miles with posters in hand, in support of their Nana. Over $2,000 was raised for the event. Support from churches, former co-workers and friends, also poured in, in the form of personal visits, food baskets and phone calls. A former associate, Judy Madigan, also a nurse at VT, made a special quilt containing pictures of the children.
“The walk was not just for me,” Janet Rodgers stipulated. “It was for all the women in the area with ovarian cancer.”
Through CaringBridge.org, a website specially created for families and friends “to connect when health matters most,” Janet Rodgers created her own website and has received more than 3,000 hits since August. “It also got 842 messages that people posted on her site,” added Tasha Cox, the children’s mother, Janet’s daughter-in-law, who is married to her son, Michael Cox. “These people just want to give her encouragement and also share their experiences as cancer victims,” Tasha added.
Janet resides with her husband Beale Rodger in Radford.

For now, the immediate and extended families are trying to live by their own philosophy: “Live today to the fullest, because tomorrow it not promised.”

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