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Town attempting to move ‘eyesore’

It’s been a good while since the Town of Pulaski tried to obtain the former Allied Chemical property to relocate the Dora Highway refuse drop site there.
But with the proximity of the current site to the New River Trial Extension, the “eyesore” it poses at the entrance to town, and the fact it is too small, Pulaski Town Council is once again looking for an alternative site.
Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell said the former Allied property, now owned by Honeywell, would be a better location, primarily because “it can’t be seen from anywhere in town.”
Worrell suggested town council authorize him to contact Honeywell again to see if the town might be able to acquire a portion of the property off Walnut Avenue and Lafayette Street on the south side of East Main Street (Rt. 99).
The mayor said the difficulty in trying to reach a deal with Honeywell is that it is such a large corporation with so many properties nationwide that it is difficult to get company officials to understand what property is being discussed.
Economic Development Director John White said another problem is that Honeywell was concerned about the possible marketability of the property, “but that may have changed now.” He noted that many of the company’s real estate experts are located in California where “they have a different world view” on the property’s value.
Worrell said if negotiations with Honeywell aren’t successful, the town will have to look at moving the drop site to the “alternative site” – the former sewer plant property.
Town Engineer Bill Pedigo said the grade of the sewer treatment plant is advantageous because dumpsters will be able to be located below ground level so people can unload without having to lift items into the boxes.
Disadvantages of the sewer plant site include its proximity to the trail and some environmental cleanup will be required before it can be opened to the public.
Advantages of the Honeywell site include it is shielded from view and there are two road accesses, Pedigo said. A disadvantage is that the property will need to be graded to get the drop boxes below ground level.
Pedigo said four to five acres are needed for the site.
Even though drop sites are not attractive, council members admitted they are beneficial in cutting back on the amount of trash discarded along area roads.

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Town attempting to move ‘eyesore’

It’s been a good while since the Town of Pulaski tried to obtain the former Allied Chemical property to relocate the Dora Highway refuse drop site there.
But with the proximity of the current site to the New River Trial Extension, the “eyesore” it poses at the entrance to town, and the fact it is too small, Pulaski Town Council is once again looking for an alternative site.
Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell said the former Allied property, now owned by Honeywell, would be a better location, primarily because “it can’t be seen from anywhere in town.”
Worrell suggested town council authorize him to contact Honeywell again to see if the town might be able to acquire a portion of the property off Walnut Avenue and Lafayette Street on the south side of East Main Street (Rt. 99).
The mayor said the difficulty in trying to reach a deal with Honeywell is that it is such a large corporation with so many properties nationwide that it is difficult to get company officials to understand what property is being discussed.
Economic Development Director John White said another problem is that Honeywell was concerned about the possible marketability of the property, “but that may have changed now.” He noted that many of the company’s real estate experts are located in California where “they have a different world view” on the property’s value.
Worrell said if negotiations with Honeywell aren’t successful, the town will have to look at moving the drop site to the “alternative site” – the former sewer plant property.
Town Engineer Bill Pedigo said the grade of the sewer treatment plant is advantageous because dumpsters will be able to be located below ground level so people can unload without having to lift items into the boxes.
Disadvantages of the sewer plant site include its proximity to the trail and some environmental cleanup will be required before it can be opened to the public.
Advantages of the Honeywell site include it is shielded from view and there are two road accesses, Pedigo said. A disadvantage is that the property will need to be graded to get the drop boxes below ground level.
Pedigo said four to five acres are needed for the site.
Even though drop sites are not attractive, council members admitted they are beneficial in cutting back on the amount of trash discarded along area roads.

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