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Va. inmates receive shot at innocence

Virginia prisoners whose case files contain evidence that could be DNA tested will soon have an opportunity to use that evidence to possibly prove their innocence if they so choose.
In an effort to fulfill requirements of a bill passed by the Virginia General Assembly in 2009, the Virginia State Crime Commission is seeking attorneys to assist in notifying inmates whose files contain DNA-testable evidence.
To participate, attorneys must attend one of five training programs being held throughout the state between Sept. 14 and Oct. 14.
The notifications would be provided pro bono (without pay), but attorneys participating in the training program will receive two MCLE (Minimum Continuing Legal Education) credits.
The closest training course will be held Wednesday, Oct. 14 at the Blacksburg Public Library at 200 Miller St. in Blacksburg. All programs run from noon to 2 p.m.
To register for the Blacksburg class or find out the dates and locations of the other training programs, visit www.exonerate.org.
In 2008, the General Assembly passed legislation directing the Forensic Science Board to “ensure that all individuals who were convicted of crimes” be notified of the existence of evidence that could be DNA tested. The purpose of the “DNA Notification Project” is to give innocent persons wrongfully convicted of a crime the opportunity to be exonerated through DNA testing.
The Department of Forensic Science found case files containing evidence suitable for DNA testing in cases ranging from 1973 to 1988.

Va. inmates receive shot at innocence

Virginia prisoners whose case files contain evidence that could be DNA tested will soon have an opportunity to use that evidence to possibly prove their innocence if they so choose.
In an effort to fulfill requirements of a bill passed by the Virginia General Assembly in 2009, the Virginia State Crime Commission is seeking attorneys to assist in notifying inmates whose files contain DNA-testable evidence.
To participate, attorneys must attend one of five training programs being held throughout the state between Sept. 14 and Oct. 14.
The notifications would be provided pro bono (without pay), but attorneys participating in the training program will receive two MCLE (Minimum Continuing Legal Education) credits.
The closest training course will be held Wednesday, Oct. 14 at the Blacksburg Public Library at 200 Miller St. in Blacksburg. All programs run from noon to 2 p.m.
To register for the Blacksburg class or find out the dates and locations of the other training programs, visit www.exonerate.org.
In 2008, the General Assembly passed legislation directing the Forensic Science Board to “ensure that all individuals who were convicted of crimes” be notified of the existence of evidence that could be DNA tested. The purpose of the “DNA Notification Project” is to give innocent persons wrongfully convicted of a crime the opportunity to be exonerated through DNA testing.
The Department of Forensic Science found case files containing evidence suitable for DNA testing in cases ranging from 1973 to 1988.