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Rico Hill’s revival stresses importance of body and spirit

When most people think of revivals, health is not a topic that comes to mind.
But for Rico Hill, health is a “critical” part of an individual’s spiritual life.
Hill said he plans to share the “whole gospel” of the Bible, including an emphasis on maintaining good health, during a Sept. 19-26 revival to be held at Pulaski Seventh Day Adventist Church at 227 Fourth St. Northwest. Services will be held at 7 p.m. each night.
Hill says revivals are a “dime a dozen,” but his message is designed to stress the importance of caring for the body God has given each of us both physically and spiritually.
The Washington, D.C. native who now lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. and comes from a background in acting and television production, provided an insight into three of the six messages he will be presenting during revival week.
“A Body of Evidence” will emphasize that each of us is “fearfully and wonderfully made” and what we get out of our bodies is determined by what we put into them.
For example, Hill points out that none of us would think of putting sugar water or soft drinks into our automobiles, but we don’t think twice about what goes into our own bodies. Just as automobiles are technological machines that must be treated with “kid gloves,” so are our bodies.
Hill said his message is “timely” given the current debate over healthcare.
“We want to share things that are preventative,” he said. As an example, he said many diabetics don’t know that their conditions are “reversible” if they take care of their bodies with proper nutrition.
To learn about alternative methods of dealing with the serious diseases that run rampant through today’s society and to “transition out of a stressful senior management job,” Hill said he spent time at a lifestyle center called Eden Valley in Colorado.
It was while he was at the center that he met Pulaski County residents Fred and Roxy St. Clair. They invited him to speak at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in February, then invited him back to do the revival.
“They wanted to do a series with someone who connects with everyday people,” Hill said, noting that his background in acting and public speaking well equipped with the ability to get his message across.
“The Lord always sets up these things behind the scenes,” he said of meeting the St. Clairs.
Hill didn’t want to spoil the suspense by giving away too much information about another one of his revival topics, “Live from New York, it’s the Dead.” However, he did say that it will show “mathematically the existence of God through the Bible.”
He added, “one thing we can’t argue with is basic math because we know two plus two equals four.”
He also plans to use the Bible to show that Baptism isn’t just a matter of being “sprinkled, you have to be immersed.” The title of that night’s message is “When a Shower Won’t Do.”
Although his background isn’t in the ministry, Hill said he believes in lay ministry because all ministries were the labors of “people who worked at regular jobs.” He says he thinks the current emphasis on seminary-trained ministers has “created apathy” in the church.
While working as an actor in California, Hill said he performed primarily in theatre, but also appeared on television shows such as the “Fresh Prince of Bel Air.” For a while he ran his own theatre company that played to audiences from elementary schools to colleges and universities.
From there he became executive director of production at the Nickelodeon network, producing hit television shows including “Jimmy Neutron” and “Fairly Odd Parents.” During this time, he also was serving as a lay minister, primarily sharing his message in a street ministry.
It was while he was working as vice president of programming at Turner Broadcasting Network’s Cartoon Network in Atlanta that he decided to leave his job behind in October 2008 “when I felt the Lord calling me into the ministry full time.”
Although he is building his ministry in Scottsdale, Ariz., he said he is looking to build a ministry that is “worldwide in scope.”
Hill said his ministry is “not about pushing the Bible or telling people they need to go to church. I believe in meeting the needs of people on a practical level” through meeting their daily needs.
For example, he said he understands Pulaski County has a lot of people who have lost jobs. “I want to reach those people and give them hope and encouragement,” he said, adding that his goal is to get all churches, “regardless what we agree on,” and the community involved in helping their fellow citizen.
His ministry is “less about sermons and more about people’s physical needs,” he says. “Coming to church and hearing a sermon isn’t going to make their life better. Getting involved is the key.”
Asked whether his ministry is designed to push a certain position in the current healthcare debate, Hill says it isn’t.
He said his ministry is geared more toward preventing problems before they develop through the “eight laws of health” set forth in the Bible.
Hill said he likes to call these laws the “eight doctors” a person needs to visit daily. He provided examples of four of the “doctors” and said he will expand on all eight at the revival.
The first four are drink lots of water, get plenty of rest, exercise and get plenty of sunshine.
“The healthcare system is set up so the doctors and insurance companies get rich, but no one is telling anyone the simple things they can do to relieve their illnesses,” he said.

“Healthcare reform from our position is changing your lifestyle,” he added. “We tackle it right at the heart of it with choices and preventative care to head off (poor health) before it starts.”

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Rico Hill’s revival stresses importance of body and spirit

When most people think of revivals, health is not a topic that comes to mind.
But for Rico Hill, health is a “critical” part of an individual’s spiritual life.
Hill said he plans to share the “whole gospel” of the Bible, including an emphasis on maintaining good health, during a Sept. 19-26 revival to be held at Pulaski Seventh Day Adventist Church at 227 Fourth St. Northwest. Services will be held at 7 p.m. each night.
Hill says revivals are a “dime a dozen,” but his message is designed to stress the importance of caring for the body God has given each of us both physically and spiritually.
The Washington, D.C. native who now lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. and comes from a background in acting and television production, provided an insight into three of the six messages he will be presenting during revival week.
“A Body of Evidence” will emphasize that each of us is “fearfully and wonderfully made” and what we get out of our bodies is determined by what we put into them.
For example, Hill points out that none of us would think of putting sugar water or soft drinks into our automobiles, but we don’t think twice about what goes into our own bodies. Just as automobiles are technological machines that must be treated with “kid gloves,” so are our bodies.
Hill said his message is “timely” given the current debate over healthcare.
“We want to share things that are preventative,” he said. As an example, he said many diabetics don’t know that their conditions are “reversible” if they take care of their bodies with proper nutrition.
To learn about alternative methods of dealing with the serious diseases that run rampant through today’s society and to “transition out of a stressful senior management job,” Hill said he spent time at a lifestyle center called Eden Valley in Colorado.
It was while he was at the center that he met Pulaski County residents Fred and Roxy St. Clair. They invited him to speak at the Seventh Day Adventist Church in February, then invited him back to do the revival.
“They wanted to do a series with someone who connects with everyday people,” Hill said, noting that his background in acting and public speaking well equipped with the ability to get his message across.
“The Lord always sets up these things behind the scenes,” he said of meeting the St. Clairs.
Hill didn’t want to spoil the suspense by giving away too much information about another one of his revival topics, “Live from New York, it’s the Dead.” However, he did say that it will show “mathematically the existence of God through the Bible.”
He added, “one thing we can’t argue with is basic math because we know two plus two equals four.”
He also plans to use the Bible to show that Baptism isn’t just a matter of being “sprinkled, you have to be immersed.” The title of that night’s message is “When a Shower Won’t Do.”
Although his background isn’t in the ministry, Hill said he believes in lay ministry because all ministries were the labors of “people who worked at regular jobs.” He says he thinks the current emphasis on seminary-trained ministers has “created apathy” in the church.
While working as an actor in California, Hill said he performed primarily in theatre, but also appeared on television shows such as the “Fresh Prince of Bel Air.” For a while he ran his own theatre company that played to audiences from elementary schools to colleges and universities.
From there he became executive director of production at the Nickelodeon network, producing hit television shows including “Jimmy Neutron” and “Fairly Odd Parents.” During this time, he also was serving as a lay minister, primarily sharing his message in a street ministry.
It was while he was working as vice president of programming at Turner Broadcasting Network’s Cartoon Network in Atlanta that he decided to leave his job behind in October 2008 “when I felt the Lord calling me into the ministry full time.”
Although he is building his ministry in Scottsdale, Ariz., he said he is looking to build a ministry that is “worldwide in scope.”
Hill said his ministry is “not about pushing the Bible or telling people they need to go to church. I believe in meeting the needs of people on a practical level” through meeting their daily needs.
For example, he said he understands Pulaski County has a lot of people who have lost jobs. “I want to reach those people and give them hope and encouragement,” he said, adding that his goal is to get all churches, “regardless what we agree on,” and the community involved in helping their fellow citizen.
His ministry is “less about sermons and more about people’s physical needs,” he says. “Coming to church and hearing a sermon isn’t going to make their life better. Getting involved is the key.”
Asked whether his ministry is designed to push a certain position in the current healthcare debate, Hill says it isn’t.
He said his ministry is geared more toward preventing problems before they develop through the “eight laws of health” set forth in the Bible.
Hill said he likes to call these laws the “eight doctors” a person needs to visit daily. He provided examples of four of the “doctors” and said he will expand on all eight at the revival.
The first four are drink lots of water, get plenty of rest, exercise and get plenty of sunshine.
“The healthcare system is set up so the doctors and insurance companies get rich, but no one is telling anyone the simple things they can do to relieve their illnesses,” he said.

“Healthcare reform from our position is changing your lifestyle,” he added. “We tackle it right at the heart of it with choices and preventative care to head off (poor health) before it starts.”

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