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Town will have to pay for sprinkler system

It appears the Town of Pulaski will be own its own when it comes to funding a fire suppression system for the new train station.
Despite an opinion from Virginia’s fire marshal supporting the town’s position that a sprinkler system should be included as part of the replacement coverage, Town Manager John Hawley said Virginia Association of Counties (VACo) Risk Management Programs has once again denied coverage for the system.
The insurance carrier “said the future use of the building is our choice, so it’s up to the town to put (the sprinkler system) in,” Hawley told members of Pulaski Town Council Tuesday night.
At issue is the potential occupancy of the building prior to the November blaze that gutted it.
The town contends the occupancy prior to the fire was more than 300, the insurance company feels it was much less.
Sprinkle systems are only required in public buildings with a potential occupancy of 300 or more people.
It’s the town’s opinion that the insurance company’s method for determining potential occupancy of the building limits its use to the point of requiring the town to receive a building of less value than it was prior to the fire because its uses would be so drastically limited.
Claude O. Hutton, senior deputy state fire marshal for the Western and Southern regions of Virginia, agrees with the town.
It will now be up to town council to decide whether to foot the estimated $75,000 to $100,000 cost of the system.
There was no discussion of funding for the system Tuesday night. However, town council members in the past have indicated a desire to cover the cost if insurance didn’t, noting that a rebuild might not be necessary if the original building had been equipped with a fire suppression system.
Hawley has said it was cost prohibitive to install a system when the building was remodeled because the work done was not extensive enough to make it economical to install one.
Under the town’s policy, the insurance company is required to cover costs of restoring the building to its prior use, as well as any necessary code upgrades.
It is the town’s position the sprinkler system is a required code upgrade. The insurance company disagrees.
Construction bids for the train station are due in Hawley’s office Friday. After the 3 p.m. deadline, he noted the bids will be opened in council chambers.
Prior to Tuesday’s meeting Hawley presented Mayor Jeff Worrell with paint color samples that are designed to return the building to its original colors.
Worrell told council that Hawley thought council members might want to choose the colors to use.
“I told him (Hawley) I didn’t know whether it was a good idea to have seven men choosing colors,” Worrell joked.

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Town will have to pay for sprinkler system

It appears the Town of Pulaski will be own its own when it comes to funding a fire suppression system for the new train station.
Despite an opinion from Virginia’s fire marshal supporting the town’s position that a sprinkler system should be included as part of the replacement coverage, Town Manager John Hawley said Virginia Association of Counties (VACo) Risk Management Programs has once again denied coverage for the system.
The insurance carrier “said the future use of the building is our choice, so it’s up to the town to put (the sprinkler system) in,” Hawley told members of Pulaski Town Council Tuesday night.
At issue is the potential occupancy of the building prior to the November blaze that gutted it.
The town contends the occupancy prior to the fire was more than 300, the insurance company feels it was much less.
Sprinkle systems are only required in public buildings with a potential occupancy of 300 or more people.
It’s the town’s opinion that the insurance company’s method for determining potential occupancy of the building limits its use to the point of requiring the town to receive a building of less value than it was prior to the fire because its uses would be so drastically limited.
Claude O. Hutton, senior deputy state fire marshal for the Western and Southern regions of Virginia, agrees with the town.
It will now be up to town council to decide whether to foot the estimated $75,000 to $100,000 cost of the system.
There was no discussion of funding for the system Tuesday night. However, town council members in the past have indicated a desire to cover the cost if insurance didn’t, noting that a rebuild might not be necessary if the original building had been equipped with a fire suppression system.
Hawley has said it was cost prohibitive to install a system when the building was remodeled because the work done was not extensive enough to make it economical to install one.
Under the town’s policy, the insurance company is required to cover costs of restoring the building to its prior use, as well as any necessary code upgrades.
It is the town’s position the sprinkler system is a required code upgrade. The insurance company disagrees.
Construction bids for the train station are due in Hawley’s office Friday. After the 3 p.m. deadline, he noted the bids will be opened in council chambers.
Prior to Tuesday’s meeting Hawley presented Mayor Jeff Worrell with paint color samples that are designed to return the building to its original colors.
Worrell told council that Hawley thought council members might want to choose the colors to use.
“I told him (Hawley) I didn’t know whether it was a good idea to have seven men choosing colors,” Worrell joked.

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