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Remembering Our WW II Veterans

Yes, remember Pearl Harbor. And we did remember; much more clearly than the Japanese, or any other nation that came into the war to join their cause. And by the time World War II was over , the number of Pulaski County men and Women who joined up volunteerly, or were drafted, included able bodied people from 17 years old to men who were grandfathers. I think we should all slow dpwn occasionally and turn our thoughts to the veterans of World War II, and the families that sacrificed so much as they watched their sons and daughters march off to war. Some families furnished one member, and some as many as six. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Jones of Dublin Road, Pulaski sent three sons, Preston, Charlie, and Herman ,Jr., with Preston being called back to serve in the conflict with North Korea.
The Heath Daltons sent three sons, Clyde, Houston, and Friel. Mr. and Mrs Sidney Stoneman sent three sons, Creed, James, and Robert. Thomas and Minnie Rash saw five sons go off to war, in various branches of service, Troy, Ralph, Bob, Paul, and George. Paul was wounded in battle. George was a prisoner of war, . Surviving that ordeal, he later served in the Korean conflict. Families with sons and daughters in the service hung small flags in their windows. George proudly shows his family’s flag, which has five stars. He keeps it in a Holy place, his Bible.
Not to take anything away from the families mentioned, Emory C,. and Alma Powers had six sons in active duty in various S.., Thomas, and Allen. Their combined total of time of service was in excess of 50 years After the war another brother joined the Army, making a total of seven of nine Powers brothers in the U.S. military service; an enviable record
From Newbern , there were five Farris brothers in service in World War II. They were, Everett, Tyree, Kent, Roscoe, and Henry. Of these, Everett made the supreme sacrifice, an Roscoe was wounded in action. The four who returned went on to become successful in business and farming, and in community service.
I am sure there were other families who furnished more than one member to the cause, and even tough I can’t name them, they are just as much appreciated by their fellow citizens.
During one year fifty three young men from Pulaski County enlisted in the U.S. Navy, and nearly all were just seventeen years old.
While hundreds of women and men were entering the regular branches of service, Pulaski was not without its home guard unit, known as the Minutemen Virginia Reserve Malitia Company No. 78.,which was formed in 1943, and was composed of 60 men who for various reasons , were not expected to be called for active duty. Their job was to be prepared in case of any unforeseeable emergency.
V. W. Moody was the first commanding officer, and the unit trained weekly. Other officeres were First Lt. Carl Shufflebarger, Second Lt. Julian Roberts Non-commissioned Sgt. L. S. Robinson, E. R. Aust, and G. F. Albert
The local American Legion Post, led by R.I. Brown and Roy C. Hall(decorated hero of World War I ), was doing its part in tending to the needs of returning veterans as well as those still in service.
The following is a quote from a wartime Southwest Times . “Always mindful of the comfort and welfare of the fighting men on all fronts the Legion sponsored a cigarette fund to provide free smokes for servicemen overseas…which enabled the post to ship nearly 500,000 cigarettes to combat zones. Letters received from the boys attested to their appreciation. The Post participated in funerals for several of the boys who died while serving their country.

The American Legion went to work the week the country entered the war, and helped to formulate Civil Defense. And it never slowed down in its support of the troops.

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Remembering Our WW II Veterans

Yes, remember Pearl Harbor. And we did remember; much more clearly than the Japanese, or any other nation that came into the war to join their cause. And by the time World War II was over , the number of Pulaski County men and Women who joined up volunteerly, or were drafted, included able bodied people from 17 years old to men who were grandfathers. I think we should all slow dpwn occasionally and turn our thoughts to the veterans of World War II, and the families that sacrificed so much as they watched their sons and daughters march off to war. Some families furnished one member, and some as many as six. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Jones of Dublin Road, Pulaski sent three sons, Preston, Charlie, and Herman ,Jr., with Preston being called back to serve in the conflict with North Korea.
The Heath Daltons sent three sons, Clyde, Houston, and Friel. Mr. and Mrs Sidney Stoneman sent three sons, Creed, James, and Robert. Thomas and Minnie Rash saw five sons go off to war, in various branches of service, Troy, Ralph, Bob, Paul, and George. Paul was wounded in battle. George was a prisoner of war, . Surviving that ordeal, he later served in the Korean conflict. Families with sons and daughters in the service hung small flags in their windows. George proudly shows his family’s flag, which has five stars. He keeps it in a Holy place, his Bible.
Not to take anything away from the families mentioned, Emory C,. and Alma Powers had six sons in active duty in various S.., Thomas, and Allen. Their combined total of time of service was in excess of 50 years After the war another brother joined the Army, making a total of seven of nine Powers brothers in the U.S. military service; an enviable record
From Newbern , there were five Farris brothers in service in World War II. They were, Everett, Tyree, Kent, Roscoe, and Henry. Of these, Everett made the supreme sacrifice, an Roscoe was wounded in action. The four who returned went on to become successful in business and farming, and in community service.
I am sure there were other families who furnished more than one member to the cause, and even tough I can’t name them, they are just as much appreciated by their fellow citizens.
During one year fifty three young men from Pulaski County enlisted in the U.S. Navy, and nearly all were just seventeen years old.
While hundreds of women and men were entering the regular branches of service, Pulaski was not without its home guard unit, known as the Minutemen Virginia Reserve Malitia Company No. 78.,which was formed in 1943, and was composed of 60 men who for various reasons , were not expected to be called for active duty. Their job was to be prepared in case of any unforeseeable emergency.
V. W. Moody was the first commanding officer, and the unit trained weekly. Other officeres were First Lt. Carl Shufflebarger, Second Lt. Julian Roberts Non-commissioned Sgt. L. S. Robinson, E. R. Aust, and G. F. Albert
The local American Legion Post, led by R.I. Brown and Roy C. Hall(decorated hero of World War I ), was doing its part in tending to the needs of returning veterans as well as those still in service.
The following is a quote from a wartime Southwest Times . “Always mindful of the comfort and welfare of the fighting men on all fronts the Legion sponsored a cigarette fund to provide free smokes for servicemen overseas…which enabled the post to ship nearly 500,000 cigarettes to combat zones. Letters received from the boys attested to their appreciation. The Post participated in funerals for several of the boys who died while serving their country.

The American Legion went to work the week the country entered the war, and helped to formulate Civil Defense. And it never slowed down in its support of the troops.

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