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Board agrees to amend Special Use Permit

Pulaski County Board of Supervisors Monday night agreed to amend the Special Use Permit for New River Valley Resource Authority and begin accepting refuse from Wythe and Bland counties.
No one spoke against at the meeting against the proposal designed to hold down potential fee increases and make up for lost business. However, two residents of the area did submit written objections.
The Authority needed to revise the permit that allows it to operate a sanitary landfill off Cloyds Mountain Road so that it can begin taking in refuse of the Joint Public Service Authority (JPSA), which serves Bland and Wythe counties.
Community Development Director Shaun Utt told board members that landfill Executive Director Joe Levine indicated a downturn in the economy and the closure of several businesses resulted in the Authority managing less refuse during the 2008-09 fiscal year than during 2007-08.
Levine reported that the landfill handled about 243,000 tons of refuse in 2007-08, but took in 30,000 fewer tons during the past fiscal year.
Since the JPSA handled about 30,000 tons of refuse over the past fiscal year, Levine indicated taking in the JPSA would “supplement one for one the tonnage loss over the past fiscal year.”
The New River Authority has 64 acres remaining to be built on its current 100-acre design and 250 acres left for future landfill use. The Authority’s property, zoned Agriculture (A-1) with a landfill overlay (LD1), consists of just over 951 acres, according to the county.
Ingles District Supervisor Ranny Akers asked Levine Monday whether it is possible to develop some kind of recycling operation at the landfill to extend the life of the facility, which he fears will not last as long as projected.
Massie District Supervisor Frank Conner disagreed with Akers that the landfill is going to “fill up sooner than we think.”
Levine said he doesn’t foresee a recycling operation at the landfill, but the Authority is “stepping up” educational programs in an effort to get customers to recycle more of the items going into the landfill.
Given the current economic climate, Akers said he isn’t expecting any recycling facilities now. He said he would just like to see the Authority looking into it for the future.
Besides approving an amendment to the Authority’s permit, the supervisors also voted to enter into an agreement with the Joint Public Service Authority (JPSA) to begin accepting its refuse.

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Board agrees to amend Special Use Permit

Pulaski County Board of Supervisors Monday night agreed to amend the Special Use Permit for New River Valley Resource Authority and begin accepting refuse from Wythe and Bland counties.
No one spoke against at the meeting against the proposal designed to hold down potential fee increases and make up for lost business. However, two residents of the area did submit written objections.
The Authority needed to revise the permit that allows it to operate a sanitary landfill off Cloyds Mountain Road so that it can begin taking in refuse of the Joint Public Service Authority (JPSA), which serves Bland and Wythe counties.
Community Development Director Shaun Utt told board members that landfill Executive Director Joe Levine indicated a downturn in the economy and the closure of several businesses resulted in the Authority managing less refuse during the 2008-09 fiscal year than during 2007-08.
Levine reported that the landfill handled about 243,000 tons of refuse in 2007-08, but took in 30,000 fewer tons during the past fiscal year.
Since the JPSA handled about 30,000 tons of refuse over the past fiscal year, Levine indicated taking in the JPSA would “supplement one for one the tonnage loss over the past fiscal year.”
The New River Authority has 64 acres remaining to be built on its current 100-acre design and 250 acres left for future landfill use. The Authority’s property, zoned Agriculture (A-1) with a landfill overlay (LD1), consists of just over 951 acres, according to the county.
Ingles District Supervisor Ranny Akers asked Levine Monday whether it is possible to develop some kind of recycling operation at the landfill to extend the life of the facility, which he fears will not last as long as projected.
Massie District Supervisor Frank Conner disagreed with Akers that the landfill is going to “fill up sooner than we think.”
Levine said he doesn’t foresee a recycling operation at the landfill, but the Authority is “stepping up” educational programs in an effort to get customers to recycle more of the items going into the landfill.
Given the current economic climate, Akers said he isn’t expecting any recycling facilities now. He said he would just like to see the Authority looking into it for the future.
Besides approving an amendment to the Authority’s permit, the supervisors also voted to enter into an agreement with the Joint Public Service Authority (JPSA) to begin accepting its refuse.

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