Duncan Suzuki

Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Ratcliffe Transportation Museum groundbreaking

The first time Town of Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell saw the train set and miniature 1950s era replica of downtown Pulaski created by Dr. Milton Brockmeyer, he said he thought to himself, "this must be preserved for future generations."
Saturday morning, Pulaski came one step closer to preserving that piece of the town’s history with a groundbreaking ceremony for the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Transportation Museum, which will eventually stand on a parcel of land at the Maple Shade Shopping Center.
The museum will house Brockmeyer’s train set and model of the town, which currently fills the entire basement of his Pulaski home, along with an antique hearse/ambulance, supposedly the only one left of its kind, which was donated by the Oscar Seagle family, and a restored antique motorized fire truck, donated by Bob Hudson.
The idea for this museum came about during the planning of the town’s centennial celebration in 1986, according to a brief history of the museum compiled by John White, economic development director for the Town of Pulaski.
At that time, Mayor Raymond F. Ratcliffe told The Southwest Times he would like to see a museum established in the basement of the town’s municipal building to display the town’s "rich cultural and industrial history."
Unfortunately, Ratcliffe died prior to the centennial celebration and the public opening of the museum, which was subsequently named in his honor. The basement museum was dedicated in February 1986.
The museum was transferred to the newly refurbished Pulaski Railway Station in 1994, and continued to grow until fire destroyed the station and much of the museum’s contents in November 2008.
During Saturday morning’s ceremony, Ty Kirkner, Ratcliffe’s grandson, said "it was my grandfather’s dream to celebrate Pulaski. He was an ambassador for the town everywhere he went— Pulaski was his top deal."
Over the years, Kirkner said his grandfather’s "rememberings" of Pulaski grew into a collection, which Kirkner’s mother, Betty Lou, added to as well. Eventually, those rememberings turned into a museum, of which Betty Lou served as the director.
"It was his dream that we would remember Pulaski, because it was so special to him," Kirkner said, and expressed appreciation on behalf of his family for all of the people who have taken part in this "labor of love" to make the museum a reality.
Brockmeyer spoke and expressed his appreciation for those who have shown support in finding a home for his train set and replica of the town, so that it can be shared with the citizens of Pulaski.
His son, Wally Brockmeyer, also spoke at Saturday’s ceremony, and said that he saw so many faces standing out in the crowd who had played a part in bringing this museum to life, and said "thanks for being supportive and for all the work you have done. God bless all of you."

Virginia delegate Anne B. Crockett-Stark also made a few comments during the event, and said that one of her favorite things about Pulaski is its "vision of past, present and future." She continued, "today, past, present and future are all coming together because of the people who have left footprints and those who continue to make footprints in Pulaski."

Comments

comments

Ratcliffe Transportation Museum groundbreaking

The first time Town of Pulaski Mayor Jeff Worrell saw the train set and miniature 1950s era replica of downtown Pulaski created by Dr. Milton Brockmeyer, he said he thought to himself, "this must be preserved for future generations."
Saturday morning, Pulaski came one step closer to preserving that piece of the town’s history with a groundbreaking ceremony for the Raymond F. Ratcliffe Transportation Museum, which will eventually stand on a parcel of land at the Maple Shade Shopping Center.
The museum will house Brockmeyer’s train set and model of the town, which currently fills the entire basement of his Pulaski home, along with an antique hearse/ambulance, supposedly the only one left of its kind, which was donated by the Oscar Seagle family, and a restored antique motorized fire truck, donated by Bob Hudson.
The idea for this museum came about during the planning of the town’s centennial celebration in 1986, according to a brief history of the museum compiled by John White, economic development director for the Town of Pulaski.
At that time, Mayor Raymond F. Ratcliffe told The Southwest Times he would like to see a museum established in the basement of the town’s municipal building to display the town’s "rich cultural and industrial history."
Unfortunately, Ratcliffe died prior to the centennial celebration and the public opening of the museum, which was subsequently named in his honor. The basement museum was dedicated in February 1986.
The museum was transferred to the newly refurbished Pulaski Railway Station in 1994, and continued to grow until fire destroyed the station and much of the museum’s contents in November 2008.
During Saturday morning’s ceremony, Ty Kirkner, Ratcliffe’s grandson, said "it was my grandfather’s dream to celebrate Pulaski. He was an ambassador for the town everywhere he went— Pulaski was his top deal."
Over the years, Kirkner said his grandfather’s "rememberings" of Pulaski grew into a collection, which Kirkner’s mother, Betty Lou, added to as well. Eventually, those rememberings turned into a museum, of which Betty Lou served as the director.
"It was his dream that we would remember Pulaski, because it was so special to him," Kirkner said, and expressed appreciation on behalf of his family for all of the people who have taken part in this "labor of love" to make the museum a reality.
Brockmeyer spoke and expressed his appreciation for those who have shown support in finding a home for his train set and replica of the town, so that it can be shared with the citizens of Pulaski.
His son, Wally Brockmeyer, also spoke at Saturday’s ceremony, and said that he saw so many faces standing out in the crowd who had played a part in bringing this museum to life, and said "thanks for being supportive and for all the work you have done. God bless all of you."

Virginia delegate Anne B. Crockett-Stark also made a few comments during the event, and said that one of her favorite things about Pulaski is its "vision of past, present and future." She continued, "today, past, present and future are all coming together because of the people who have left footprints and those who continue to make footprints in Pulaski."

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login