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Public invited to Museum groundbreaking

The pubic is invited to come out to the Maple Shade Shopping Center Saturday morning for the official conveyance of the Brockmeyer train display to the Town of Pulaski and the groundbreaking of the new Raymond F. Ratcliffe Transportation Museum.
The ceremony gets underway at 10 a.m. at the site of the future museum, a parcel of land on the east side of the Maple Shade Shopping Center.
The Dr. Milton Brockmeyer train set will not be present Saturday, but the ceremony will mark the official transfer of the set to the town. Under the agreement with the Brockmeyer family the set will not be moved to the museum until the museum is completed.
The replica of downtown Pulaski in the 1950’s is so large a section of Dr. Brockmeyer’s basement wall will have to be removed, and then replaced with a door, to get the set out of the house.
Once the museum is completed, it will have come a long way since its inception.
According to a brief history of the museum compiled by Economic Development Director John White, the idea came about during the planning of the town’s Centennial celebration in 1986.
At that time, Mayor Raymond F. Ratcliffe told The Southwest Times he would like to see a museum established in the basement of the Municipal Building to display the town’s “rich cultural and industrial history.”
Unfortunately, Ratcliffe died prior to the Centennial celebration and the public opening of the museum, which was subsequently named in his honor. The basement museum was dedicated in February 1986.
The museum was transferred to the newly refurbished train station off Washington Avenue in 1994, and continued to grow until fire destroyed the station and much of the museum’s contents in November 2008.
When the new museum is completed, the Brockmeyer train set and several historic vehicles will serve as a central focus of the museum.
Saturday’s event is slated to include a welcome by White, remarks by Mayor Jeff Worrell, Del. Annie B. Crockett-Stark (R-Wytheville) and a member of the Kirkner family, conveyance of the train set by Dr. Brockmeyer, a groundbreaking by area dignitaries and refreshments to follow.
The Kirkner family includes Museum Director Betty Lou Kirkner (Ratcliffe’s daughter) and Ty Kirkner (Ratcliffe’s grandson). Ty Kirkner has been instrumental in overseeing the museum planning.

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Public invited to Museum groundbreaking

The pubic is invited to come out to the Maple Shade Shopping Center Saturday morning for the official conveyance of the Brockmeyer train display to the Town of Pulaski and the groundbreaking of the new Raymond F. Ratcliffe Transportation Museum.
The ceremony gets underway at 10 a.m. at the site of the future museum, a parcel of land on the east side of the Maple Shade Shopping Center.
The Dr. Milton Brockmeyer train set will not be present Saturday, but the ceremony will mark the official transfer of the set to the town. Under the agreement with the Brockmeyer family the set will not be moved to the museum until the museum is completed.
The replica of downtown Pulaski in the 1950’s is so large a section of Dr. Brockmeyer’s basement wall will have to be removed, and then replaced with a door, to get the set out of the house.
Once the museum is completed, it will have come a long way since its inception.
According to a brief history of the museum compiled by Economic Development Director John White, the idea came about during the planning of the town’s Centennial celebration in 1986.
At that time, Mayor Raymond F. Ratcliffe told The Southwest Times he would like to see a museum established in the basement of the Municipal Building to display the town’s “rich cultural and industrial history.”
Unfortunately, Ratcliffe died prior to the Centennial celebration and the public opening of the museum, which was subsequently named in his honor. The basement museum was dedicated in February 1986.
The museum was transferred to the newly refurbished train station off Washington Avenue in 1994, and continued to grow until fire destroyed the station and much of the museum’s contents in November 2008.
When the new museum is completed, the Brockmeyer train set and several historic vehicles will serve as a central focus of the museum.
Saturday’s event is slated to include a welcome by White, remarks by Mayor Jeff Worrell, Del. Annie B. Crockett-Stark (R-Wytheville) and a member of the Kirkner family, conveyance of the train set by Dr. Brockmeyer, a groundbreaking by area dignitaries and refreshments to follow.
The Kirkner family includes Museum Director Betty Lou Kirkner (Ratcliffe’s daughter) and Ty Kirkner (Ratcliffe’s grandson). Ty Kirkner has been instrumental in overseeing the museum planning.

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