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Pulaski Waterworks continued

By the late 1930s, Pulaski citizens had re-worded the old saying that was used in the first in this series of articles to “Water, water, everywhere, but not enough to drink.”
New businesses and industries continued to move into the thriving town, demanding more water, while some citizens were complaining about the quality of water from Hogan’s dam, saying that occasionally a tadpole would come in to kitchen faucets along with the water. Town fathers were once again scratching their heads. It seemed that in spite of all they could do, the need for water always exceeded the supply. The newspaper was once again running notices in which citizens were encouraged, or actually commanded to conserve water by using less, and not using it for watering lawns, or for other purposes not considered emergencies.
A search began for other sources; one being finding a location for a new dam southwest of town, and west of Hogan’s Dam, in a new watershed. Also there was talk of purchasing a bold spring on the land of Warden, and known as Warden Spring, located a few miles eastward from the town, now owned by the Bill Rhudy Farm
Seemingly with no other way to rurn, the Warden Spring plan was chosen, and the land purchased. A ten inch cast iron pipe line was required to pump the spring water westward into the town. This line is still in place, and runs along Bank Street eastward, crossing the south end of the present Bob White Boulevard, and on to the a pumping station at the spring. Whether this was a good plan is questionable, but at the time it seemed that there was no alternative.
Every indication at the time was that Warden Spring would be the answer to Pulaski’s age-old water problem. Several years after the project was completed, a study was made of the Thorn Spring watershed, that fed the spring. It has never been explained why this study did not preceed the establishment of this system. Thorn Spring Branch runs through several hundred acres of pasture land and some tilled farm land. And the stream sinks into the ground several hundred feet before coming out in the form of Warden Spring.
As a part of the study, dye was introduced into the water near the point where it sinks into the ground. Engineers were not surprised when the dye came out in the spring water. Ac fact that was not a part of the conversation of the day was that much of the cool spring water that was pumped into the tank on Randolph Avenue was not pure, but cxontained a quantity of pasture field debris from farms along Thorn Spring Branch. Townspeople of course felt some relief from water shortage, but the water was so full of lime that it became a joke around town that the water was so hard it wouldn’t turn soap to lather.
Warden Spring was not a lost cause though, In times of drouth, the town fell back on it many times while a more suitable supply could be secured, which it finally was.
Next week we will talk about Raines’ Hollow.

Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

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Pulaski Waterworks continued

By the late 1930s, Pulaski citizens had re-worded the old saying that was used in the first in this series of articles to “Water, water, everywhere, but not enough to drink.”
New businesses and industries continued to move into the thriving town, demanding more water, while some citizens were complaining about the quality of water from Hogan’s dam, saying that occasionally a tadpole would come in to kitchen faucets along with the water. Town fathers were once again scratching their heads. It seemed that in spite of all they could do, the need for water always exceeded the supply. The newspaper was once again running notices in which citizens were encouraged, or actually commanded to conserve water by using less, and not using it for watering lawns, or for other purposes not considered emergencies.
A search began for other sources; one being finding a location for a new dam southwest of town, and west of Hogan’s Dam, in a new watershed. Also there was talk of purchasing a bold spring on the land of Warden, and known as Warden Spring, located a few miles eastward from the town, now owned by the Bill Rhudy Farm
Seemingly with no other way to rurn, the Warden Spring plan was chosen, and the land purchased. A ten inch cast iron pipe line was required to pump the spring water westward into the town. This line is still in place, and runs along Bank Street eastward, crossing the south end of the present Bob White Boulevard, and on to the a pumping station at the spring. Whether this was a good plan is questionable, but at the time it seemed that there was no alternative.
Every indication at the time was that Warden Spring would be the answer to Pulaski’s age-old water problem. Several years after the project was completed, a study was made of the Thorn Spring watershed, that fed the spring. It has never been explained why this study did not preceed the establishment of this system. Thorn Spring Branch runs through several hundred acres of pasture land and some tilled farm land. And the stream sinks into the ground several hundred feet before coming out in the form of Warden Spring.
As a part of the study, dye was introduced into the water near the point where it sinks into the ground. Engineers were not surprised when the dye came out in the spring water. Ac fact that was not a part of the conversation of the day was that much of the cool spring water that was pumped into the tank on Randolph Avenue was not pure, but cxontained a quantity of pasture field debris from farms along Thorn Spring Branch. Townspeople of course felt some relief from water shortage, but the water was so full of lime that it became a joke around town that the water was so hard it wouldn’t turn soap to lather.
Warden Spring was not a lost cause though, In times of drouth, the town fell back on it many times while a more suitable supply could be secured, which it finally was.
Next week we will talk about Raines’ Hollow.

Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

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