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Fate smiles upon Pulaski

It’s not often everything falls into place when a project is undertaken, but it appears as though fate is smiling upon plans to upgrade the southeast section of Pulaski.
If not fate, the federal government apparently approves.
Town Manager John Hawley found out Friday Pulaski was selected to receive about $1.7 million in economic stimulus funds to rehabilitate the southeast sewer system. The sewer project was one of nine the town submitted to the government in February in hopes of obtaining funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009.
Hawley found out in March the project had made it onto a draft priority list of projects that could receive stimulus funding. However, he pointed out that making it onto the list didn’t guarantee the project would be fully funded.
The cost of projects on the list, just under $115 million, was almost double the approximately $77 million in stimulus funds that had been allocated to the State Water Control Board for public wastewater collection and treatment facilities.
At that time, Hawley also wasn’t certain whether the funds would be a loan or grant. A letter to Hawley from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality indicates the maximum loan amount is $1,683,000 “with 100 percent principal forgiveness.”
The town applied for the funding through the DEQ.
Pulaski will have to foot the bill for an estimated $29,500 in engineering costs for the two-phase sewer rehabilitation project.
The first phase would rehabilitate 3,000 feet of 18-inch and 3,000 feet of 24-inch concrete sanitary sewer main pipe in order to reduce the amount of infiltration entering the treatment system. It is estimated to cost $737,000 to complete.
Phase II would rehabilitate 6,000 feet of 30-inch pipe at an estimated cost of just over $1 million.
Receipt of the funds is dependant upon the town being able “to meet required timeframes for moving the project to construction …,” the DEQ letter states. The construction contract must be awarded by Nov. 30 or the DEQ can withdraw the funds. The amount of funding also may be reduced if construction bids are lower than estimated.

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Fate smiles upon Pulaski

It’s not often everything falls into place when a project is undertaken, but it appears as though fate is smiling upon plans to upgrade the southeast section of Pulaski.
If not fate, the federal government apparently approves.
Town Manager John Hawley found out Friday Pulaski was selected to receive about $1.7 million in economic stimulus funds to rehabilitate the southeast sewer system. The sewer project was one of nine the town submitted to the government in February in hopes of obtaining funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009.
Hawley found out in March the project had made it onto a draft priority list of projects that could receive stimulus funding. However, he pointed out that making it onto the list didn’t guarantee the project would be fully funded.
The cost of projects on the list, just under $115 million, was almost double the approximately $77 million in stimulus funds that had been allocated to the State Water Control Board for public wastewater collection and treatment facilities.
At that time, Hawley also wasn’t certain whether the funds would be a loan or grant. A letter to Hawley from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality indicates the maximum loan amount is $1,683,000 “with 100 percent principal forgiveness.”
The town applied for the funding through the DEQ.
Pulaski will have to foot the bill for an estimated $29,500 in engineering costs for the two-phase sewer rehabilitation project.
The first phase would rehabilitate 3,000 feet of 18-inch and 3,000 feet of 24-inch concrete sanitary sewer main pipe in order to reduce the amount of infiltration entering the treatment system. It is estimated to cost $737,000 to complete.
Phase II would rehabilitate 6,000 feet of 30-inch pipe at an estimated cost of just over $1 million.
Receipt of the funds is dependant upon the town being able “to meet required timeframes for moving the project to construction …,” the DEQ letter states. The construction contract must be awarded by Nov. 30 or the DEQ can withdraw the funds. The amount of funding also may be reduced if construction bids are lower than estimated.

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