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Employment jumps from May to June

Job growth in the Blacksburg-Christiansburg-Radford metropolitan area is down 1.5 percent, according to the Virginia Employment Commission’s monthly nonfarm employment report for June 2009.
The goods-producing sector, which includes mining, construction and manufacturing, was down a net 7.2 percent, or 1,100, because of vehicle-related factory layoffs, according to a press release from Bill Mezger, chief economist for the VEC.
In addition, the service-providing sector was unchanged from last June at 56,300, but there was a publishable 100 increase in total government.
Statewide, Virginia’s nonfarm employment expanded 4,500 from May to June, but the June job count of 3,695,000, while the highest recorded so far in 2009, was still 2.9 percent below the June 2008 level of 3,806,800.
June 2009 unemployment comparisons with other states show Virginia’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.2 percent placed Virginia as the 14th best-ranking state among all the states, Mezger said.
He also noted in the press release that Virginia had the lowest unemployment rate among the 13 largest states with over 3.5 million nonfarm employment bases. North Dakota, with 4.2 percent seasonally adjusted unemployment, was the lowest state, and Michigan, with 15.2 seasonally adjusted unemployment, had the highest rate.
For June, no major U.S. area had less than 6 percent seasonally unadjusted unemployment, with the lowest major area being Oklahoma City, Okla. The Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, D.C./Virginia/Maryland/West Virginia area had the second-best ranking among the nation’s 49 major metropolitan areas with populations of one million, or more, with 6.6 percent seasonally unadjusted unemployment, Mezger said.
As for industry gain or loss from June 2008 to June 2009, Mezger reported the following:
•three Virginia industrial sectors still managed to add new jobs. Those three sectors included: private education and health care, up 8,700 jobs or 2 percent; total government, up to 3,600 jobs, or 0.5 percent; and mining, up 300 jobs, or 2.7 percent.
•Virginia’s job loss in the last year was largely caused by contractions in four industries: construction, down 33,400 jobs, or 14.7 percent; manufacturing, down 27,800 jobs, or 10.4 percent; professional and business services, down 23,600 jobs, or 3.6 percent; and trade, down 17,700 jobs, or 3.3. percent. However, there were also cutbacks in information, leisure and hospitality, miscellaneous services, and finance.
•Private education and health care added 8,700 jobs, or 2 percent, for a June 2009 level of 449,100.
•The stimulus monies were starting to show up at all levels of government. Total government employment rose 3,600, or 0.5 percent from last June to a level of 699,600.

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Employment jumps from May to June

Job growth in the Blacksburg-Christiansburg-Radford metropolitan area is down 1.5 percent, according to the Virginia Employment Commission’s monthly nonfarm employment report for June 2009.
The goods-producing sector, which includes mining, construction and manufacturing, was down a net 7.2 percent, or 1,100, because of vehicle-related factory layoffs, according to a press release from Bill Mezger, chief economist for the VEC.
In addition, the service-providing sector was unchanged from last June at 56,300, but there was a publishable 100 increase in total government.
Statewide, Virginia’s nonfarm employment expanded 4,500 from May to June, but the June job count of 3,695,000, while the highest recorded so far in 2009, was still 2.9 percent below the June 2008 level of 3,806,800.
June 2009 unemployment comparisons with other states show Virginia’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 7.2 percent placed Virginia as the 14th best-ranking state among all the states, Mezger said.
He also noted in the press release that Virginia had the lowest unemployment rate among the 13 largest states with over 3.5 million nonfarm employment bases. North Dakota, with 4.2 percent seasonally adjusted unemployment, was the lowest state, and Michigan, with 15.2 seasonally adjusted unemployment, had the highest rate.
For June, no major U.S. area had less than 6 percent seasonally unadjusted unemployment, with the lowest major area being Oklahoma City, Okla. The Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, D.C./Virginia/Maryland/West Virginia area had the second-best ranking among the nation’s 49 major metropolitan areas with populations of one million, or more, with 6.6 percent seasonally unadjusted unemployment, Mezger said.
As for industry gain or loss from June 2008 to June 2009, Mezger reported the following:
•three Virginia industrial sectors still managed to add new jobs. Those three sectors included: private education and health care, up 8,700 jobs or 2 percent; total government, up to 3,600 jobs, or 0.5 percent; and mining, up 300 jobs, or 2.7 percent.
•Virginia’s job loss in the last year was largely caused by contractions in four industries: construction, down 33,400 jobs, or 14.7 percent; manufacturing, down 27,800 jobs, or 10.4 percent; professional and business services, down 23,600 jobs, or 3.6 percent; and trade, down 17,700 jobs, or 3.3. percent. However, there were also cutbacks in information, leisure and hospitality, miscellaneous services, and finance.
•Private education and health care added 8,700 jobs, or 2 percent, for a June 2009 level of 449,100.
•The stimulus monies were starting to show up at all levels of government. Total government employment rose 3,600, or 0.5 percent from last June to a level of 699,600.

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