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Six of nine Pulaski schools meet goals

During the 2008-09 school year, six of the Pulaski County school division’s nine schools met AYP (adequate yearly progress) goals.
AYP is a calculation made yearly based on No Child Left Behind federal legislation. In these calculations, schools are required to make increasing benchmarks set forth by NCLB in all of several subgroups as well as by the entire school population in grades three through twelve.
For a school to have made AYP, at least 81 percent of students overall and students in all AYP subgroups— white, black, Hispanic, limited English proficient, students with disabilities and economically disadvantaged— must have demonstrated proficiency on Standards of Learning (SOL) and other assessments in reading, and 79 percent must have passed state tests in math, according to a press release from the Virginia Department of Education.
During Thursday afternoon’s Pulaski County School Board meeting, Dr. Don Stowers, superintendent of schools, announced that in Pulaski County, the schools that met AYP goals this school year include Dublin Elementary School, which is an improvement from the last two years, when the school did not make AYP, Dublin Middle School, Pulaski Middle School, Snowville Elementary School, Newbern Elementary School and Pulaski County High School.
The schools that did not make AYP include Critzer Elementary, which did not meet the benchmark for reading for the first time, Pulaski Elementary School, which did not make the benchmark for reading and did not make AYP for the third year in a row, and Riverlawn Elementary, which did not meet benchmarks in reading or math for the first time.
As an overall school division, Pulaski County did not make AYP for the 2008-09 school year.
For the 2009-10 school year, AYP benchmarks will be set at 83 percent for reading and 81 percent for math, Stowers said.
The ultimate goal of this legislation is to work toward 100 percent proficiency.
Despite the higher benchmarks this year, 1,321, or 71 percent of the commonwealth’s 1,855 public schools made AYP by meeting or exceeding all objectives in reading, math, and other indicators of academic progress, compared with 74 percent last year, according to the VDOE press release.

"Meeting annual AYP benchmarks becomes increasingly challenging as required pass rates move closer to 100 percent," said Board of Education president Mark E. Emblidge. "I encourage educators to continue their focus on instruction while policymakers determine how federal education law must evolve to maintain accountability without penalizing schools that really are making progress."

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Six of nine Pulaski schools meet goals

During the 2008-09 school year, six of the Pulaski County school division’s nine schools met AYP (adequate yearly progress) goals.
AYP is a calculation made yearly based on No Child Left Behind federal legislation. In these calculations, schools are required to make increasing benchmarks set forth by NCLB in all of several subgroups as well as by the entire school population in grades three through twelve.
For a school to have made AYP, at least 81 percent of students overall and students in all AYP subgroups— white, black, Hispanic, limited English proficient, students with disabilities and economically disadvantaged— must have demonstrated proficiency on Standards of Learning (SOL) and other assessments in reading, and 79 percent must have passed state tests in math, according to a press release from the Virginia Department of Education.
During Thursday afternoon’s Pulaski County School Board meeting, Dr. Don Stowers, superintendent of schools, announced that in Pulaski County, the schools that met AYP goals this school year include Dublin Elementary School, which is an improvement from the last two years, when the school did not make AYP, Dublin Middle School, Pulaski Middle School, Snowville Elementary School, Newbern Elementary School and Pulaski County High School.
The schools that did not make AYP include Critzer Elementary, which did not meet the benchmark for reading for the first time, Pulaski Elementary School, which did not make the benchmark for reading and did not make AYP for the third year in a row, and Riverlawn Elementary, which did not meet benchmarks in reading or math for the first time.
As an overall school division, Pulaski County did not make AYP for the 2008-09 school year.
For the 2009-10 school year, AYP benchmarks will be set at 83 percent for reading and 81 percent for math, Stowers said.
The ultimate goal of this legislation is to work toward 100 percent proficiency.
Despite the higher benchmarks this year, 1,321, or 71 percent of the commonwealth’s 1,855 public schools made AYP by meeting or exceeding all objectives in reading, math, and other indicators of academic progress, compared with 74 percent last year, according to the VDOE press release.

"Meeting annual AYP benchmarks becomes increasingly challenging as required pass rates move closer to 100 percent," said Board of Education president Mark E. Emblidge. "I encourage educators to continue their focus on instruction while policymakers determine how federal education law must evolve to maintain accountability without penalizing schools that really are making progress."

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