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Habitual drunk driver to serve time

A Dublin man with a history of eight intoxicated driving convictions will have to serve most of a five-year prison sentence for driving as a habitual offender a year ago.
Commonwealth’s Attorney Mike Fleenor told Pulaski County Circuit Court Judge Colin Gibb Thursday that it appears George Paul Hamby has as many as eight intoxicated driving convictions and three convictions of driving after being declared a habitual offender.
Hamby’s record “speaks for itself,” Fleenor said. “It’s troubling in that it appears most, if not all, of his offenses were alcohol related.”
Fleenor called Hamby “sort of a recipe for disaster really.”
Hamby’s defense attorney pointed out “there’s no denying Mr. Hamby has a problem with alcohol. But he was raised around that and thought that was the way it was supposed to be.”
The attorney pointed out that Hamby was driving a moped when arrested Aug. 24, 2008 for driving as a habitual offender. “If anyone had been hurt that day, it would’ve been him.”
Judge Gibb disagreed. He said Hamby could have struck someone with the moped and caused serious injuries.
Nonetheless, the defense attorney asked Gibb to sentence Hamby to the mandatory minimum of one year in prison, adding that the damage could have been much worse if Hamby had had an accident while driving a car or truck.
Fleenor noted that the police report from August 2008 indicates Hamby was intoxicated when operating the moped. Plus, he said, Hamby had been drinking and tested positive for marijuana use when Hamby met with a probation officer for a sentencing report.
Judge Gibb said Hamby has a “horrible record” so he has “no problem in this case” with imposing the mandatory minimum sentence. “If it had been a car I’d have given him the maximum. It’s dangerous even if you’re driving a moped.”
The judge decided to impose a sentence that was at the midpoint in the state sentencing guidelines. He imposed a five-year prison sentence, with one year and four months suspended. Hamby will be placed on three years probation upon release.
Gibb said he has no problem with Hamby serving the sentence “in the therapeutic community (receiving substance abuse treatment). It would probably be a good thing. But don’t come back (before the court on new charges) and don’t drive another vehicle.”
Hamby was given until Sept. 8 to report to jail to begin the sentence.

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Habitual drunk driver to serve time

A Dublin man with a history of eight intoxicated driving convictions will have to serve most of a five-year prison sentence for driving as a habitual offender a year ago.
Commonwealth’s Attorney Mike Fleenor told Pulaski County Circuit Court Judge Colin Gibb Thursday that it appears George Paul Hamby has as many as eight intoxicated driving convictions and three convictions of driving after being declared a habitual offender.
Hamby’s record “speaks for itself,” Fleenor said. “It’s troubling in that it appears most, if not all, of his offenses were alcohol related.”
Fleenor called Hamby “sort of a recipe for disaster really.”
Hamby’s defense attorney pointed out “there’s no denying Mr. Hamby has a problem with alcohol. But he was raised around that and thought that was the way it was supposed to be.”
The attorney pointed out that Hamby was driving a moped when arrested Aug. 24, 2008 for driving as a habitual offender. “If anyone had been hurt that day, it would’ve been him.”
Judge Gibb disagreed. He said Hamby could have struck someone with the moped and caused serious injuries.
Nonetheless, the defense attorney asked Gibb to sentence Hamby to the mandatory minimum of one year in prison, adding that the damage could have been much worse if Hamby had had an accident while driving a car or truck.
Fleenor noted that the police report from August 2008 indicates Hamby was intoxicated when operating the moped. Plus, he said, Hamby had been drinking and tested positive for marijuana use when Hamby met with a probation officer for a sentencing report.
Judge Gibb said Hamby has a “horrible record” so he has “no problem in this case” with imposing the mandatory minimum sentence. “If it had been a car I’d have given him the maximum. It’s dangerous even if you’re driving a moped.”
The judge decided to impose a sentence that was at the midpoint in the state sentencing guidelines. He imposed a five-year prison sentence, with one year and four months suspended. Hamby will be placed on three years probation upon release.
Gibb said he has no problem with Hamby serving the sentence “in the therapeutic community (receiving substance abuse treatment). It would probably be a good thing. But don’t come back (before the court on new charges) and don’t drive another vehicle.”
Hamby was given until Sept. 8 to report to jail to begin the sentence.

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