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Bonds issued for sewer expansion

Pulaski County supervisors have given the go-ahead to issue almost $1.2 million in bonds to help cover the cost of sewer system improvements that will expand service into Highland Park subdivision.
Pulaski County administrator Peter Huber said the cost of the project is partially being covered by a grant and partially by a loan. The bonds will cover the loan portion of the cost.
Monday night’s vote allows the county to issue up to $1,187,600 in bonds.
Huber said the project bids came in $300,000 less than was budgeted. The low bid was $1.4 million, he added.
Plans to expand county sewer system into the subdivision, off Lee Highway north of Dublin, have been in the works for about five years. According to discussion during an August board meeting, the project was delayed when seven property owners would not voluntarily give the county easements across their properties.
At that time, the supervisors authorized the county to seek court-ordered condemnation of the property to gain the needed easements. Condemnation can be used by a government entity to obtain easement rights across a piece of property by eminent domain when the project for which the easement is needed is for the "public good."
Last fall, Highland Park resident Swanson Stout told the board it was time for them to do whatever was necessary to get the easements so the project could proceed to construction. He said the longer the project was stalled, the more it would cost. Plus, he added, a number of property owners were being forced to have failing septic systems repaired due to the delays.
Stout expressed concern that some of the houses might become uninhabitable if sewer wasn’t made available to them soon. Apparently some of the properties in the development are having difficulty getting the soil to “perk” again after their aging septic systems fail.
"It’s for the health, safety and welfare of the citizens who live there," Stout said in August of the project’s urgency.
At that time Huber told the supervisors, "Sometimes the rights of an individual have to be weighed against the good of the many." He pointed out that it was only a "small percentage" of the properties from which easements could not be attained.

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Bonds issued for sewer expansion

Pulaski County supervisors have given the go-ahead to issue almost $1.2 million in bonds to help cover the cost of sewer system improvements that will expand service into Highland Park subdivision.
Pulaski County administrator Peter Huber said the cost of the project is partially being covered by a grant and partially by a loan. The bonds will cover the loan portion of the cost.
Monday night’s vote allows the county to issue up to $1,187,600 in bonds.
Huber said the project bids came in $300,000 less than was budgeted. The low bid was $1.4 million, he added.
Plans to expand county sewer system into the subdivision, off Lee Highway north of Dublin, have been in the works for about five years. According to discussion during an August board meeting, the project was delayed when seven property owners would not voluntarily give the county easements across their properties.
At that time, the supervisors authorized the county to seek court-ordered condemnation of the property to gain the needed easements. Condemnation can be used by a government entity to obtain easement rights across a piece of property by eminent domain when the project for which the easement is needed is for the "public good."
Last fall, Highland Park resident Swanson Stout told the board it was time for them to do whatever was necessary to get the easements so the project could proceed to construction. He said the longer the project was stalled, the more it would cost. Plus, he added, a number of property owners were being forced to have failing septic systems repaired due to the delays.
Stout expressed concern that some of the houses might become uninhabitable if sewer wasn’t made available to them soon. Apparently some of the properties in the development are having difficulty getting the soil to “perk” again after their aging septic systems fail.
"It’s for the health, safety and welfare of the citizens who live there," Stout said in August of the project’s urgency.
At that time Huber told the supervisors, "Sometimes the rights of an individual have to be weighed against the good of the many." He pointed out that it was only a "small percentage" of the properties from which easements could not be attained.

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