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Disconnection dates remain unchanged

A motion to give Town of Pulaski residents three days less to pay their water bills before it is disconnected died Tuesday for lack of a second.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley told town council members the staff is seeking to reduce from 10 to seven the number of days between water bill due dates and disconnections in order to reduce overtime pay in the finance department.
He explained that with due dates on the 15th of the month and disconnections on the 26th, employees of the finance department only have one or two days “to get (the past due amount) into the program so that the next month’s bill can be generated.”
As a result, he noted, employees of the finance department end up working overtime to get the data into the system.
Hawley said the request to change the current process was being brought before council even though the way the current town code is written, council action wouldn’t be required.
Under the current code, disconnections cannot be made until five calendar days after disconnect notices have been mailed to the customer.
With the current system allowing 10 days after the due date before disconnections begin, staff indicated it takes two employees “a minimum of two days” to review the town’s 4,500 water/sewer accounts. Two more days are then needed to “run the final billing report, print the bills and get them ready to mail.
The town is paying about seven hours of overtime in some cases in order to get the new bills into the mail by the last business day of the month, a memo provided to town council states.
With 10 days between due dates and disconnects, staff points out that customers really have 25 days to pay their bill after receiving it in the mail. With the proposed change, they would still have 22 days.
The town had more than 200 disconnects last month, when Memorial Day altered the normal schedule and some customers didn’t make note of the altered schedule printed on their bills.
Mayor Jeff Worrell said he couldn’t support the change because of the present economy. He said he doesn’t think the economic conditions are conducive to giving customers less time to pay their bills, especially given the number of cut-offs are at an “all time high.”
However, Councilman Morgan Welker said he thinks three weeks from the date of receipt is enough time for a customer to get the bill paid, especially if it is going to save the town money by reducing overtime pay.
Welker made a motion to authorize the change, but it died for lack of a second.
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. was absent and, therefore, did not vote on the issue.

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Disconnection dates remain unchanged

A motion to give Town of Pulaski residents three days less to pay their water bills before it is disconnected died Tuesday for lack of a second.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley told town council members the staff is seeking to reduce from 10 to seven the number of days between water bill due dates and disconnections in order to reduce overtime pay in the finance department.
He explained that with due dates on the 15th of the month and disconnections on the 26th, employees of the finance department only have one or two days “to get (the past due amount) into the program so that the next month’s bill can be generated.”
As a result, he noted, employees of the finance department end up working overtime to get the data into the system.
Hawley said the request to change the current process was being brought before council even though the way the current town code is written, council action wouldn’t be required.
Under the current code, disconnections cannot be made until five calendar days after disconnect notices have been mailed to the customer.
With the current system allowing 10 days after the due date before disconnections begin, staff indicated it takes two employees “a minimum of two days” to review the town’s 4,500 water/sewer accounts. Two more days are then needed to “run the final billing report, print the bills and get them ready to mail.
The town is paying about seven hours of overtime in some cases in order to get the new bills into the mail by the last business day of the month, a memo provided to town council states.
With 10 days between due dates and disconnects, staff points out that customers really have 25 days to pay their bill after receiving it in the mail. With the proposed change, they would still have 22 days.
The town had more than 200 disconnects last month, when Memorial Day altered the normal schedule and some customers didn’t make note of the altered schedule printed on their bills.
Mayor Jeff Worrell said he couldn’t support the change because of the present economy. He said he doesn’t think the economic conditions are conducive to giving customers less time to pay their bills, especially given the number of cut-offs are at an “all time high.”
However, Councilman Morgan Welker said he thinks three weeks from the date of receipt is enough time for a customer to get the bill paid, especially if it is going to save the town money by reducing overtime pay.
Welker made a motion to authorize the change, but it died for lack of a second.
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. was absent and, therefore, did not vote on the issue.

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