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Town may get more than expected from corridor

If the Town of Pulaski chooses to move forward with a boundary adjustment, the Route 99 corridor may offer more than was originally thought, the town manager said.
John Hawley said he and consultants from TischlerBise, Inc. looked at the Route 99 and Route 11 corridors the last time the consulting firm visited the town to discuss a potential boundary adjustment. The Bethesda, Md. Firm has been hired to study the feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of the town taking in additional property.
The area being studied would move the town limits to the "other side of (Interstate) 81" along the Route 99 corridor, Hawley said earlier this week.
"There are still some advantages to going out there," the town manager told members of Pulaski Town Council. He noted there is not much area for industrial development along Route 99, but there is commercial potential.
Mayor Jeff Worrell agreed. "There may be more developable land (along side roads) out there than we thought," he said.
Hawley said the adjustment project is still in the data collection phase, but once all the pertinent information is collected TischlerBise will develop a cost analysis so council can decide whether it is worthwhile to pursue an adjustment.
In addition to the Route 99 corridor, the town also is considering the Route 11 corridor out to around Pulaski Country Club. Hawley said that corridor doesn’t offer much in the area of industrial development either, adding "the potential for industrial development is very limited."
Earlier, Hawley stressed the boundary adjustment under consideration is not an annexation.
"Annexation and boundary adjustments are two different things," he said. While annexations are court-driven expansions of territory, he noted that boundary adjustments are written agreements between two jurisdictions that agree to the adjustment.
In this case, it would be an agreement between the Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County.
Hawley said the county is aware of the town’s desire to expand its boundaries, and even helped to select the consulting firm.
As part of the study, TischlerBise will develop a "fiscal impact analysis" and determine what beneficial or detrimental effects the adjustment would have for the town and the county.
Before the adjustment could be approved it would have to be beneficial for both sides and both sides would have to agree to the changes.
The cost of the study is $32,700, which includes all expenses.

Town may get more than expected from corridor

If the Town of Pulaski chooses to move forward with a boundary adjustment, the Route 99 corridor may offer more than was originally thought, the town manager said.
John Hawley said he and consultants from TischlerBise, Inc. looked at the Route 99 and Route 11 corridors the last time the consulting firm visited the town to discuss a potential boundary adjustment. The Bethesda, Md. Firm has been hired to study the feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of the town taking in additional property.
The area being studied would move the town limits to the "other side of (Interstate) 81" along the Route 99 corridor, Hawley said earlier this week.
"There are still some advantages to going out there," the town manager told members of Pulaski Town Council. He noted there is not much area for industrial development along Route 99, but there is commercial potential.
Mayor Jeff Worrell agreed. "There may be more developable land (along side roads) out there than we thought," he said.
Hawley said the adjustment project is still in the data collection phase, but once all the pertinent information is collected TischlerBise will develop a cost analysis so council can decide whether it is worthwhile to pursue an adjustment.
In addition to the Route 99 corridor, the town also is considering the Route 11 corridor out to around Pulaski Country Club. Hawley said that corridor doesn’t offer much in the area of industrial development either, adding "the potential for industrial development is very limited."
Earlier, Hawley stressed the boundary adjustment under consideration is not an annexation.
"Annexation and boundary adjustments are two different things," he said. While annexations are court-driven expansions of territory, he noted that boundary adjustments are written agreements between two jurisdictions that agree to the adjustment.
In this case, it would be an agreement between the Town of Pulaski and Pulaski County.
Hawley said the county is aware of the town’s desire to expand its boundaries, and even helped to select the consulting firm.
As part of the study, TischlerBise will develop a "fiscal impact analysis" and determine what beneficial or detrimental effects the adjustment would have for the town and the county.
Before the adjustment could be approved it would have to be beneficial for both sides and both sides would have to agree to the changes.
The cost of the study is $32,700, which includes all expenses.