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First case of swine flu in New River Valley documented

The New River Valley’s first case of the swine flu (H1N1) virus was recorded Wednesday, just one day before the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a swine flu pandemic.
Robert Parker, southwest regional public information officer for the New River Valley Health District, could not be reached for comment on the local case. The case was added to the Virginia Department of Health website Wednesday.
Bobby Clark, emergency management coordinator for Pulaski County, said the county is aware of the case, but New River Health District will not specify in what county the case exists.
The New River Health District includes the counties of Floyd, Giles, Montgomery and Pulaski, and Radford City.
On Wednesday, WHO reported 27,737 cases and 141 deaths worldwide as a result of the virus. Associated Press reports that ordinary flu kills about 250,000 to 500,000 people annually.
WHO says the pandemic announcement does not mean the situation is worsening, since no mutations have been detected in the virus to show it is getting more deadly. It just means countries should activate pandemic plans and that the spread now meets the definition of a pandemic.
While most cases of H1N1 are mild and don’t require any treatment, health officials are concerned that the situation could overwhelm the health system, according to Associated Press.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that, H1N1 (Novel influenza A) is a new flu virus of swine origin that was first detected in Mexico and the United States in March and April.
A pandemic announcement also serves as confirmation that a new form of flu is quickly circling the globe, thus triggering drug makers to speed production of vaccines and urging governments to take actions to contain it.
Treatment and preventive measures to contain its spread, are similar to those used to respond to seasonal flu, according to the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).
Symptoms of H1N1 typically include fever, cough and sore throat, but it may also produce a headache, chills, fatigue and body aches.
The virus may be passed to others for a period of up to seven days after onset, or longer if symptoms remain.
VDH urges anyone showing symptoms of the virus to:
• Stay home from school or work and limit contact with others.
• Call their health care provider or health department before seeking care so infection control measures can be put into place.
• Cover their nose or mouth with a tissue when they cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Wash their hands often with soap and water, especially following a cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective.
• Limit close contact with sick people.
• Avoid touching their eyes, nose or mouth.
As a result of the latest confirmed case of swine flu in Virginia, VDH will now concentrate its testing for the virus on people with a high risk of complications, such as pregnant women, the very young and the elderly, people hospitalized with flu-like symptoms, and people with underlying chronic health conditions.
The first case of H1N1 was confirmed April 15. Eleven days later, the United States government declared a public health emergency. By June 3, the virus was being reported in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.
WHO reports the swine flu pandemic is the first global flu epidemic in 41 years. The last pandemic, the Hong Kong flu in 1968, killed a million people.
Most people who have contracted the virus have recovered without the need for medical treatment, the CDC reports.
AP reports that several countries urged WHO not to declare a pandemic in May, for fear it would spark mass panic.
In Argentina emergency health services have collapsed due to a flood of people worrying about swine flu, according to AP. People in Chile stoned a bus last month because they thought a passenger had the virus.

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First case of swine flu in New River Valley documented

The New River Valley’s first case of the swine flu (H1N1) virus was recorded Wednesday, just one day before the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a swine flu pandemic.
Robert Parker, southwest regional public information officer for the New River Valley Health District, could not be reached for comment on the local case. The case was added to the Virginia Department of Health website Wednesday.
Bobby Clark, emergency management coordinator for Pulaski County, said the county is aware of the case, but New River Health District will not specify in what county the case exists.
The New River Health District includes the counties of Floyd, Giles, Montgomery and Pulaski, and Radford City.
On Wednesday, WHO reported 27,737 cases and 141 deaths worldwide as a result of the virus. Associated Press reports that ordinary flu kills about 250,000 to 500,000 people annually.
WHO says the pandemic announcement does not mean the situation is worsening, since no mutations have been detected in the virus to show it is getting more deadly. It just means countries should activate pandemic plans and that the spread now meets the definition of a pandemic.
While most cases of H1N1 are mild and don’t require any treatment, health officials are concerned that the situation could overwhelm the health system, according to Associated Press.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that, H1N1 (Novel influenza A) is a new flu virus of swine origin that was first detected in Mexico and the United States in March and April.
A pandemic announcement also serves as confirmation that a new form of flu is quickly circling the globe, thus triggering drug makers to speed production of vaccines and urging governments to take actions to contain it.
Treatment and preventive measures to contain its spread, are similar to those used to respond to seasonal flu, according to the Virginia Department of Health (VDH).
Symptoms of H1N1 typically include fever, cough and sore throat, but it may also produce a headache, chills, fatigue and body aches.
The virus may be passed to others for a period of up to seven days after onset, or longer if symptoms remain.
VDH urges anyone showing symptoms of the virus to:
• Stay home from school or work and limit contact with others.
• Call their health care provider or health department before seeking care so infection control measures can be put into place.
• Cover their nose or mouth with a tissue when they cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Wash their hands often with soap and water, especially following a cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective.
• Limit close contact with sick people.
• Avoid touching their eyes, nose or mouth.
As a result of the latest confirmed case of swine flu in Virginia, VDH will now concentrate its testing for the virus on people with a high risk of complications, such as pregnant women, the very young and the elderly, people hospitalized with flu-like symptoms, and people with underlying chronic health conditions.
The first case of H1N1 was confirmed April 15. Eleven days later, the United States government declared a public health emergency. By June 3, the virus was being reported in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.
WHO reports the swine flu pandemic is the first global flu epidemic in 41 years. The last pandemic, the Hong Kong flu in 1968, killed a million people.
Most people who have contracted the virus have recovered without the need for medical treatment, the CDC reports.
AP reports that several countries urged WHO not to declare a pandemic in May, for fear it would spark mass panic.
In Argentina emergency health services have collapsed due to a flood of people worrying about swine flu, according to AP. People in Chile stoned a bus last month because they thought a passenger had the virus.

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