Widgetized Section

Go to Admin » Appearance » Widgets » and move Gabfire Widget: Social into that MastheadOverlay zone

Yard sale mania

I wonder if anyone knows when the yard sale craze started. I have tried to find out, but it seems to have just dropped out of nowhere. I hardly ever go to one, but actually they are really my favorite of all sales. Yard sales, garage sales, basement sales, carport sales and moving sales are all pretty much the same. Now they even have multi-family yard sales that fall right in with the rest. I guess I’ll have to write and ask Mr. Know-it-all. He never misses.
I wonder how many millions of these sales are held in the United States every year, or how many in Pulaski County in a year. From the very first warm days of spring until early winter, one can drive up and down our city streets and country roads on week-ends, and see signs tacked or pasted on anything that is not alive, telling of a yard sale nearby. The greatest thing about these particular types of sales is that one seems to always find bargains. Nothing is ever priced above its original price, and if such should be the case, a little dickering can usually bring the price down. I have never purchased an item at a yard sale that was not a bargain.
The inventory of these vendors is unbelievable. It is amazing to me how many thousands of items there are that families no longer feel they need, and at the same time these same items draw great crowds of people who do seem to need them; sometimes so desperately that they almost fight over them. Did you know that there are large numbers of people who rise early on week-end mornings and grab the classified section of the newspapers to check on the locations of the week-end’s yard sales. After a quick check, they are off in their trucks and cars on what I call the “yard sale run.” It’s hard to be the first one there, but the race is always on.
Yard sale chasers are just about as dedicated as golfers to the duty at hand. Sometimes they go as families, so they will have more eyes and hands at work, as they discuss proposed purchases across the tables, lest they miss something good. I find it interesting to read the yard sale ads. On one Friday there were thirty advertised in the local paper. One was advertised as a multi-family, another an eight family sale, and still another saying the sale would cover an entire block. And they are all described as being either large, huge, two, three, or multi-family, or block.
Some people have only one sale in a lifetime, while some have one a year, and some even have one weekly. I believe those we see every week are speculators, who go from sale to sale buying things to re-sell. I am not being critical of this practice, because one must consider it to be a part of America’s system of free enterprise. Driving through the town one may see certain posts or poles that contain several hundred nails, pins, and staples that once held notices of huge yard sales. Some of the signs one sees vary in material from wood to notebook paper. Whatever the means of advertising, the average yard sale is successful for the person holding it.
My neighbor came rushing in here today, breathlessly telling me about the two bargain model automobiles he bought at a yard sale, at just five dollars each. It hurt me, but I had to point out to him that one was an Edsel.
I’ve learned from experience that a person can’t judge a yard sale by the quality or color of its sign. Sometimes the ugliest signs lead to the best treasures. The yard sale mania seems to have thus far avoided being taxed by the tax-happy governing bodies. I hate to call their attention to this, but so far, neither the town, county, state, or federal government gets a penny out of this lucrative business. I wonder how much longer they can let it go on.
Sometime when you have nothing else to do on a Saturday morning, try a bit of yard sale hopping. You will meet a lot of interesting people, and who knows, you may find a bargain item or two to take back home. They are great places to purchase shower gifts. Just make sure you don’t forget, and give someone something you purchased at his or her yard sale. You could get it back come Christmas.
I hope that I am not leaving the impression that yard sales are bad, because that certainly is not my intention.

Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

Comments

comments

Yard sale mania

I wonder if anyone knows when the yard sale craze started. I have tried to find out, but it seems to have just dropped out of nowhere. I hardly ever go to one, but actually they are really my favorite of all sales. Yard sales, garage sales, basement sales, carport sales and moving sales are all pretty much the same. Now they even have multi-family yard sales that fall right in with the rest. I guess I’ll have to write and ask Mr. Know-it-all. He never misses.
I wonder how many millions of these sales are held in the United States every year, or how many in Pulaski County in a year. From the very first warm days of spring until early winter, one can drive up and down our city streets and country roads on week-ends, and see signs tacked or pasted on anything that is not alive, telling of a yard sale nearby. The greatest thing about these particular types of sales is that one seems to always find bargains. Nothing is ever priced above its original price, and if such should be the case, a little dickering can usually bring the price down. I have never purchased an item at a yard sale that was not a bargain.
The inventory of these vendors is unbelievable. It is amazing to me how many thousands of items there are that families no longer feel they need, and at the same time these same items draw great crowds of people who do seem to need them; sometimes so desperately that they almost fight over them. Did you know that there are large numbers of people who rise early on week-end mornings and grab the classified section of the newspapers to check on the locations of the week-end’s yard sales. After a quick check, they are off in their trucks and cars on what I call the “yard sale run.” It’s hard to be the first one there, but the race is always on.
Yard sale chasers are just about as dedicated as golfers to the duty at hand. Sometimes they go as families, so they will have more eyes and hands at work, as they discuss proposed purchases across the tables, lest they miss something good. I find it interesting to read the yard sale ads. On one Friday there were thirty advertised in the local paper. One was advertised as a multi-family, another an eight family sale, and still another saying the sale would cover an entire block. And they are all described as being either large, huge, two, three, or multi-family, or block.
Some people have only one sale in a lifetime, while some have one a year, and some even have one weekly. I believe those we see every week are speculators, who go from sale to sale buying things to re-sell. I am not being critical of this practice, because one must consider it to be a part of America’s system of free enterprise. Driving through the town one may see certain posts or poles that contain several hundred nails, pins, and staples that once held notices of huge yard sales. Some of the signs one sees vary in material from wood to notebook paper. Whatever the means of advertising, the average yard sale is successful for the person holding it.
My neighbor came rushing in here today, breathlessly telling me about the two bargain model automobiles he bought at a yard sale, at just five dollars each. It hurt me, but I had to point out to him that one was an Edsel.
I’ve learned from experience that a person can’t judge a yard sale by the quality or color of its sign. Sometimes the ugliest signs lead to the best treasures. The yard sale mania seems to have thus far avoided being taxed by the tax-happy governing bodies. I hate to call their attention to this, but so far, neither the town, county, state, or federal government gets a penny out of this lucrative business. I wonder how much longer they can let it go on.
Sometime when you have nothing else to do on a Saturday morning, try a bit of yard sale hopping. You will meet a lot of interesting people, and who knows, you may find a bargain item or two to take back home. They are great places to purchase shower gifts. Just make sure you don’t forget, and give someone something you purchased at his or her yard sale. You could get it back come Christmas.
I hope that I am not leaving the impression that yard sales are bad, because that certainly is not my intention.

Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.

Comments

comments

You must be logged in to post a comment Login