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Attacking deer not rabid

A deer that was showing aggressive behavior in the Delton section of the county earlier this week did not have rabies.
Troy Phillips with Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries said results of tests on tissue from the deer he killed last Wednesday were received Friday and were negative for rabies.
Although that deer showed signs of aggression and lack of fear, there still is no way to confirm whether the deer Phillips killed was the same deer that attacked several residents of that area last Saturday and Monday.
The game department reports that while some does may be protective of fawns, it is unusual for deer to display the type of “extremely aggressive behavior” involved in the attacks.
Conservation police received calls from Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office twice this past week to report separate attacks that occurred within half a mile of each other.
The first report was made Saturday, May 16 and involved attacks on a 42-year-old man and his seven-year-old son. In that case, authorities said the child had an abrasion on his face and the father had bruises and a broken left arm. The father told officers that the deer attacked them in the front yard of their home when they pulled up in a car and got out to go inside.
The officer was unable to locate the deer during a search that day.
The second attack occurred Monday, but was not reported to game officials until Tuesday. In that case, the victim, a man, reported that he was kicked and bitten by a deer while clearing brush on his property. The man did not seek medical treatment until Tuesday, after learning of the Saturday attack.
Phillips responded to the scene of the second attack Wednesday morning, where he observed three deer while interviewing the man who had been attacked. The officer reported that two of the deer fled but one “circled and exhibited aggressive behavior.” When the deer approached Phillips in an aggressive manner, he shot and killed it.
VDGIF officers canvassed the area in an effort to determine whether anyone else had been attacked or witnessed aggressive behavior in deer.
Officers also are attempting to find out whether anyone in that area is feeding or illegally holding deer in captivity because wildlife biologists in other states have found aggressive behavior in deer held in captivity.
County residents are asked to report any incidents of aggressive behavior in deer to the department’s 24-hour communications center, 804-367-1258. Residents also are advised to avoid contact with aggressive deer and to report deer that do not exhibit a fear of people.
According to a 1993 report by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, rabies is extremely rare in white-tailed deer.
Some other conditions which can cause the same signs as rabies in deer include trauma, brain abscesses, tumors, meningitis, ear mites, and severe meningeal worm infections, SCWDS notes.

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Attacking deer not rabid

A deer that was showing aggressive behavior in the Delton section of the county earlier this week did not have rabies.
Troy Phillips with Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries said results of tests on tissue from the deer he killed last Wednesday were received Friday and were negative for rabies.
Although that deer showed signs of aggression and lack of fear, there still is no way to confirm whether the deer Phillips killed was the same deer that attacked several residents of that area last Saturday and Monday.
The game department reports that while some does may be protective of fawns, it is unusual for deer to display the type of “extremely aggressive behavior” involved in the attacks.
Conservation police received calls from Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office twice this past week to report separate attacks that occurred within half a mile of each other.
The first report was made Saturday, May 16 and involved attacks on a 42-year-old man and his seven-year-old son. In that case, authorities said the child had an abrasion on his face and the father had bruises and a broken left arm. The father told officers that the deer attacked them in the front yard of their home when they pulled up in a car and got out to go inside.
The officer was unable to locate the deer during a search that day.
The second attack occurred Monday, but was not reported to game officials until Tuesday. In that case, the victim, a man, reported that he was kicked and bitten by a deer while clearing brush on his property. The man did not seek medical treatment until Tuesday, after learning of the Saturday attack.
Phillips responded to the scene of the second attack Wednesday morning, where he observed three deer while interviewing the man who had been attacked. The officer reported that two of the deer fled but one “circled and exhibited aggressive behavior.” When the deer approached Phillips in an aggressive manner, he shot and killed it.
VDGIF officers canvassed the area in an effort to determine whether anyone else had been attacked or witnessed aggressive behavior in deer.
Officers also are attempting to find out whether anyone in that area is feeding or illegally holding deer in captivity because wildlife biologists in other states have found aggressive behavior in deer held in captivity.
County residents are asked to report any incidents of aggressive behavior in deer to the department’s 24-hour communications center, 804-367-1258. Residents also are advised to avoid contact with aggressive deer and to report deer that do not exhibit a fear of people.
According to a 1993 report by the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, rabies is extremely rare in white-tailed deer.
Some other conditions which can cause the same signs as rabies in deer include trauma, brain abscesses, tumors, meningitis, ear mites, and severe meningeal worm infections, SCWDS notes.

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