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Pepper’s Ferry is ‘back in black’

Most people hope for rain so their yards won’t turn brown, but officials at the regional wastewater treatment facility wish for rain so the facility’s bank account doesn’t dry up.
Although it may sound strange that rain could affect a budget, that is the case at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority. It’s the case simply because the more rain, the more runoff there is into storm drains, which, in turn, increases wastewater flows into the facility. Since localities served by Pepper’s Ferry are billed based on the amount of wastewater flowing into the plant from their sewage pipes, the more water flowing in, the more money flowing into the budget.
Even though rainfall is still below average at the Fairlawn plant, the Authority’s board of directors got some good news last week – the budget is back in the black.
“I’ve been real pleased with the rainfall” over the past few months, Executive Director Clarke Wallcraft told the board at last Thursday’s meeting. However, he cautiously reminded board members that rainfall is still running slightly below average for that area.
As of Thursday, Wallcraft said 11.86 inches had been recorded at the facility through the end of April. That is still a little more than two inches below the 14-inch average for the first third of the year. Average annual rainfall there is 42 inches, he reports.
Nonetheless, he reported that the Authority is “back in the black.”
Wallcraft said rainfall, coupled with the “fiscally conservative approach the staff has taken” helped revenues to move into the positive category for the first time in a while.
Drought or near-drought conditions over the past few years had not only taken a toll on the facility’s reserves, but also had caused revenue to drop below projections in the current fiscal year budget.

Pepper’s Ferry is ‘back in black’

Most people hope for rain so their yards won’t turn brown, but officials at the regional wastewater treatment facility wish for rain so the facility’s bank account doesn’t dry up.
Although it may sound strange that rain could affect a budget, that is the case at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority. It’s the case simply because the more rain, the more runoff there is into storm drains, which, in turn, increases wastewater flows into the facility. Since localities served by Pepper’s Ferry are billed based on the amount of wastewater flowing into the plant from their sewage pipes, the more water flowing in, the more money flowing into the budget.
Even though rainfall is still below average at the Fairlawn plant, the Authority’s board of directors got some good news last week – the budget is back in the black.
“I’ve been real pleased with the rainfall” over the past few months, Executive Director Clarke Wallcraft told the board at last Thursday’s meeting. However, he cautiously reminded board members that rainfall is still running slightly below average for that area.
As of Thursday, Wallcraft said 11.86 inches had been recorded at the facility through the end of April. That is still a little more than two inches below the 14-inch average for the first third of the year. Average annual rainfall there is 42 inches, he reports.
Nonetheless, he reported that the Authority is “back in the black.”
Wallcraft said rainfall, coupled with the “fiscally conservative approach the staff has taken” helped revenues to move into the positive category for the first time in a while.
Drought or near-drought conditions over the past few years had not only taken a toll on the facility’s reserves, but also had caused revenue to drop below projections in the current fiscal year budget.