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County to hold Day of Prayer event on lawn of old courthouse

Thursday, May 7 is the National Day of Prayer.
Locally, Pulaski County will recognize this day with an event on the lawn of the old Pulaski County Courthouse on West Main Street in Pulaski from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m.
The event program is as follows:
•12:15 p.m.- Opening Prayer by Pastor Rusty Whitener, Pulaski Presbyterian Church
•12:20 p.m.- Prayer for the youth of our nation by Dr. Michael Perry, principal of Pulaski Middle School
•12:25 p.m.- Prayer for our community doctors, nurses, police, fire fighters and EMT by Dr. James Wienke-retired surgeon from Pulaski
•12:30 p.m.- Prayer for our government by Marc LeBlanc, local attorney
•12:35 p.m.- Prayer for our veterans and our active military men and women serving our nation by retired U.S. Army Infantry 1st Sergeant (E8) James Morris of Pulaski
•12:40 p.m. Closing prayer for our nation by Pastor Tom Underwood of Christ Fellowship Church in Pulaski
In the case of rain, this event will be held in the general district courtroom.
Brenda Prosser is serving as the organizer for this event for the first time. She noted that in the early 1990s, Judge Glenwood (Woody) Lookabill and David Taylor, pastor of the Dublin Baptist Church coordinated the first Pulaski County National Day of Prayer.
When asked why she believes it is important for the citizens of Pulaski County to take part in the National Day of Prayer, Prosser responded, "prayer has defined this great nation from the first bleak winter for the pilgrims at Plymouth. Our founding fathers firmly believed that this young nation was a direct gift from God and that the only way to insure protection of this gift was through prayer."
Prosser also mentioned several examples of what some might attribute to the power of prayer throughout history.
She said President Abraham Lincoln believed that “it is the duty of nations as well as men, to owe their dependence upon the overruling power of God.”
Before the deciding battle of Gettysburg, President Lincoln put his words into action as he turned to God in prayer. He has been quoted as saying, “I went to my room one day and I locked the door and got down on my knees before Almighty God and prayed to him mightily for victory at Gettysburg."
Prosser pointed out that ultimately, this important battle allowed this nation to stay united and as a result, slaves were set free.
She also noted that when the U.S. troops were going ashore at Normandy, President Franklin Roosevelt asked that our nation unite in prayer saying, “Let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons where so ever they may be. And, O Lord, give us faith. Give us faith in Thee.”
"A year and a half later, World War II ended and one of the world’s greatest evils was defeated," Prosser said.
In present times, Prosser said the need for this nation to come together and recognize the National Day of Prayer "is even greater as we are fighting battles on many fronts. We also face fear of epidemics, financial crisis, broken families, homeless citizens, sexual immorality, overwhelming drug abuse, violence and social strife."
She added, "As the heroes of this great nation did in the past, we again need to bow our heads in prayer and ask the Lord to bless our leaders with wisdom and protection, and ask him to give us the fortitude to overcome the challenges at hand. If Roosevelt, the Pilgrims and Lincoln never underestimated the power of prayer, neither should we."

County to hold Day of Prayer event on lawn of old courthouse

Thursday, May 7 is the National Day of Prayer.
Locally, Pulaski County will recognize this day with an event on the lawn of the old Pulaski County Courthouse on West Main Street in Pulaski from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m.
The event program is as follows:
•12:15 p.m.- Opening Prayer by Pastor Rusty Whitener, Pulaski Presbyterian Church
•12:20 p.m.- Prayer for the youth of our nation by Dr. Michael Perry, principal of Pulaski Middle School
•12:25 p.m.- Prayer for our community doctors, nurses, police, fire fighters and EMT by Dr. James Wienke-retired surgeon from Pulaski
•12:30 p.m.- Prayer for our government by Marc LeBlanc, local attorney
•12:35 p.m.- Prayer for our veterans and our active military men and women serving our nation by retired U.S. Army Infantry 1st Sergeant (E8) James Morris of Pulaski
•12:40 p.m. Closing prayer for our nation by Pastor Tom Underwood of Christ Fellowship Church in Pulaski
In the case of rain, this event will be held in the general district courtroom.
Brenda Prosser is serving as the organizer for this event for the first time. She noted that in the early 1990s, Judge Glenwood (Woody) Lookabill and David Taylor, pastor of the Dublin Baptist Church coordinated the first Pulaski County National Day of Prayer.
When asked why she believes it is important for the citizens of Pulaski County to take part in the National Day of Prayer, Prosser responded, "prayer has defined this great nation from the first bleak winter for the pilgrims at Plymouth. Our founding fathers firmly believed that this young nation was a direct gift from God and that the only way to insure protection of this gift was through prayer."
Prosser also mentioned several examples of what some might attribute to the power of prayer throughout history.
She said President Abraham Lincoln believed that “it is the duty of nations as well as men, to owe their dependence upon the overruling power of God.”
Before the deciding battle of Gettysburg, President Lincoln put his words into action as he turned to God in prayer. He has been quoted as saying, “I went to my room one day and I locked the door and got down on my knees before Almighty God and prayed to him mightily for victory at Gettysburg."
Prosser pointed out that ultimately, this important battle allowed this nation to stay united and as a result, slaves were set free.
She also noted that when the U.S. troops were going ashore at Normandy, President Franklin Roosevelt asked that our nation unite in prayer saying, “Let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons where so ever they may be. And, O Lord, give us faith. Give us faith in Thee.”
"A year and a half later, World War II ended and one of the world’s greatest evils was defeated," Prosser said.
In present times, Prosser said the need for this nation to come together and recognize the National Day of Prayer "is even greater as we are fighting battles on many fronts. We also face fear of epidemics, financial crisis, broken families, homeless citizens, sexual immorality, overwhelming drug abuse, violence and social strife."
She added, "As the heroes of this great nation did in the past, we again need to bow our heads in prayer and ask the Lord to bless our leaders with wisdom and protection, and ask him to give us the fortitude to overcome the challenges at hand. If Roosevelt, the Pilgrims and Lincoln never underestimated the power of prayer, neither should we."