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Kathy Mattea says be aware of your appetite for energy

PRINCETON, WV – Grammy-winning singer songwriter Kathy Mattea took a break from her busy schedule to meet with art patrons and reporters in Princeton, W. Va. on Friday to talk about the mining industry. In addition to her aggressive concert tour to promote her latest album entitled Coal, she has a slide presentation on her laptop computer she likes to share with those interested in saving our planet.
Mattea says she’s not into being one of those celebrities who goes around promoting her "cause." However, she is one of 2,600 dedicated volunteers who educate the public about climate change through The Climate Project.
These presenters are from across the globe, are personally trained by Al Gore and have reached an estimated 4 million people worldwide. The presentations include information about the threat of global warming and attempt to raise awareness by bringing people together and informing them of potential solutions to preserve climate balance.
"This has to do with becoming aware of our appetite for energy and doing something about it," Mattea said. She decided to make a record of coal miner songs and go back through the tradition. Her quest to find 10 songs for her album turned into discovering hundreds of coal songs from all over the world.
In a release, Mattea says she wanted to pay tribute to "my place and my people" on a record that is as much a textured novel as it is an album. Raised near Charleston, West Virginia, her mining heritage is thick: both her parents grew up in coal camps, both her grandfathers were miners, her mother worked for the local UMWA.
Her father was saved from the mines by an uncle who paid his way through college. "It’s a coming together of a lot of different threads in my life," Mattea says.
Mattea’s childhood was steeped in the culture of mining and Appalachia, but despite having a wide range of influences and "being a sponge about music," she wasn’t exposed to much traditional mountain music. "I never thought I had an ear for singing real heavy Appalachian music," she says. "I marvel at the wonder of someone like Hazel Dickens, I just never thought I could do that."
Mattea presented a collection of personal family photographs along with slides from The Climate Change project and other sources to present a message of awareness and personal responsibility to change our appetite for energy. She told of what is like to be in the coal mines and of those depending upon them for their livelihood. She showed some of the dangers left behind by the mining companies and their "mountaintop removal" mining process. She gave examples of mining disasters.

During the presentation, Mattea and guitarist Bill Cooley performing two songs from her recent "Coal" album.

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Kathy Mattea says be aware of your appetite for energy

PRINCETON, WV – Grammy-winning singer songwriter Kathy Mattea took a break from her busy schedule to meet with art patrons and reporters in Princeton, W. Va. on Friday to talk about the mining industry. In addition to her aggressive concert tour to promote her latest album entitled Coal, she has a slide presentation on her laptop computer she likes to share with those interested in saving our planet.
Mattea says she’s not into being one of those celebrities who goes around promoting her "cause." However, she is one of 2,600 dedicated volunteers who educate the public about climate change through The Climate Project.
These presenters are from across the globe, are personally trained by Al Gore and have reached an estimated 4 million people worldwide. The presentations include information about the threat of global warming and attempt to raise awareness by bringing people together and informing them of potential solutions to preserve climate balance.
"This has to do with becoming aware of our appetite for energy and doing something about it," Mattea said. She decided to make a record of coal miner songs and go back through the tradition. Her quest to find 10 songs for her album turned into discovering hundreds of coal songs from all over the world.
In a release, Mattea says she wanted to pay tribute to "my place and my people" on a record that is as much a textured novel as it is an album. Raised near Charleston, West Virginia, her mining heritage is thick: both her parents grew up in coal camps, both her grandfathers were miners, her mother worked for the local UMWA.
Her father was saved from the mines by an uncle who paid his way through college. "It’s a coming together of a lot of different threads in my life," Mattea says.
Mattea’s childhood was steeped in the culture of mining and Appalachia, but despite having a wide range of influences and "being a sponge about music," she wasn’t exposed to much traditional mountain music. "I never thought I had an ear for singing real heavy Appalachian music," she says. "I marvel at the wonder of someone like Hazel Dickens, I just never thought I could do that."
Mattea presented a collection of personal family photographs along with slides from The Climate Change project and other sources to present a message of awareness and personal responsibility to change our appetite for energy. She told of what is like to be in the coal mines and of those depending upon them for their livelihood. She showed some of the dangers left behind by the mining companies and their "mountaintop removal" mining process. She gave examples of mining disasters.

During the presentation, Mattea and guitarist Bill Cooley performing two songs from her recent "Coal" album.

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