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PCHS students get a feel for the ‘real world’

Juniors from Pulaski County High School got a feel for the working world Thursday through job shadowing with the Youth Excel Program (YEP).
The Chamber of Commerce introduced YEP last fall as a mentoring program, giving PCHS juniors the opportunity to shadow local professionals throughout a full day of work, exposing them to the realities and requirements of jobs and careers they might be interested in.
On Thursday, the students shadowed approximately 100 professionals throughout the New River Valley, in career fields ranging from law enforcement, to local government to health care to education.
The Southwest Times hosted PCHS junior Michelle Boothe, who commented that she was interested in learning about any aspect of a newspaper career.
Throughout the day, she spent time working with several staff members at The Southwest Times, including the publisher, news editor, composing director, press operator and advertising director.
Another PCHS student, Roger Warf, spent the day with Ava Stilwell, director of the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) for Pulaski County.
Stilwell said she and Warf spent most of the day "party planning" and making preparations for the program’s annual Volunteer Recognition event, in which the near 200 volunteers throughout the area are honored for the over 27,000 hours they have devoted to community service.
Warf said that at the beginning of the day Thursday, he didn’t really know much about what RSVP is, but by the end, he had learned quite a bit about how the program works and helps elderly members of the community.
Another PCHS junior, Dakota Hill, spent Thursday with Pulaski’s fire marshal Chip Hutchinson.
Hill commented that he wanted to shadow Hutchinson mainly because he was interested in learning more about that type of career.
Brittany Reed had the opportunity to spend the day with John Hawley, town manager for Pulaski.
Reed said she chose to work with Hawley simply because she wanted to learn more about what the town manager does. In addition, as a resident of the Belspring area of the county, Reed said she didn’t know much about the Town of Pulaski, so YEP gave her an opportunity to learn more about it, including things in the town such as the trail extension and parks, the water treatment facility, and more.
Hawley said the students who spent the day with Town of Pulaski officials and employees had the chance to share their input on their impressions of the town, as well as events they would like to see take place.
"They are an impressive bunch of young people," Hawley said. "They really care about what’s going on and want to be a part of it, and that’s exciting."

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PCHS students get a feel for the ‘real world’

Juniors from Pulaski County High School got a feel for the working world Thursday through job shadowing with the Youth Excel Program (YEP).
The Chamber of Commerce introduced YEP last fall as a mentoring program, giving PCHS juniors the opportunity to shadow local professionals throughout a full day of work, exposing them to the realities and requirements of jobs and careers they might be interested in.
On Thursday, the students shadowed approximately 100 professionals throughout the New River Valley, in career fields ranging from law enforcement, to local government to health care to education.
The Southwest Times hosted PCHS junior Michelle Boothe, who commented that she was interested in learning about any aspect of a newspaper career.
Throughout the day, she spent time working with several staff members at The Southwest Times, including the publisher, news editor, composing director, press operator and advertising director.
Another PCHS student, Roger Warf, spent the day with Ava Stilwell, director of the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) for Pulaski County.
Stilwell said she and Warf spent most of the day "party planning" and making preparations for the program’s annual Volunteer Recognition event, in which the near 200 volunteers throughout the area are honored for the over 27,000 hours they have devoted to community service.
Warf said that at the beginning of the day Thursday, he didn’t really know much about what RSVP is, but by the end, he had learned quite a bit about how the program works and helps elderly members of the community.
Another PCHS junior, Dakota Hill, spent Thursday with Pulaski’s fire marshal Chip Hutchinson.
Hill commented that he wanted to shadow Hutchinson mainly because he was interested in learning more about that type of career.
Brittany Reed had the opportunity to spend the day with John Hawley, town manager for Pulaski.
Reed said she chose to work with Hawley simply because she wanted to learn more about what the town manager does. In addition, as a resident of the Belspring area of the county, Reed said she didn’t know much about the Town of Pulaski, so YEP gave her an opportunity to learn more about it, including things in the town such as the trail extension and parks, the water treatment facility, and more.
Hawley said the students who spent the day with Town of Pulaski officials and employees had the chance to share their input on their impressions of the town, as well as events they would like to see take place.
"They are an impressive bunch of young people," Hawley said. "They really care about what’s going on and want to be a part of it, and that’s exciting."

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