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Woolwine ‘in denial’ about past drug use

A Pulaski man who pleded guilty to twice selling morphine to a police informant last June says he now realizes what drugs are doing to his life.
“I’ve been in denial about my drug use,” Michael Wayne Woolwine told Judge Robert Turk. However, he said it has now “come to my attention it’s affecting my life.”
Woolwine also told the judge, “the last time I saw you in Montgomery County (on breaking and entering and grand larceny charges) I asked for help.” Now, he said, “I’m asking for help again.”
Judge Turk told Woolwine the only help he could offer is available through probation.
“It’s a hard process to go through,” the judge said of the process of overcoming a drug addiction. “There are going to be bumps in the road. We will work with you as long as you work with us, but that’s about all I can offer you at this point.’
Woolwine, who was already on probation, faced a maximum of 80 years in prison on the two morphine distribution charges.
Judge Turk imposed a 10-year sentence on each, with all but a year on each suspended. He will be placed on three years of supervised probation upon release from custody and his privilege to operate a motor vehicle in Virginia has been suspended for 12 months (six on each count).
The judge agreed to give Woolwine until May 16 to report to jail to begin serving the sentence.

In summarizing evidence in the case, Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Skip Schwab said a confidential informant purchased two morphine pills from Woolwine on June 18 and, then again on June 19. He said the pills cost $30 apiece.

Woolwine ‘in denial’ about past drug use

A Pulaski man who pleded guilty to twice selling morphine to a police informant last June says he now realizes what drugs are doing to his life.
“I’ve been in denial about my drug use,” Michael Wayne Woolwine told Judge Robert Turk. However, he said it has now “come to my attention it’s affecting my life.”
Woolwine also told the judge, “the last time I saw you in Montgomery County (on breaking and entering and grand larceny charges) I asked for help.” Now, he said, “I’m asking for help again.”
Judge Turk told Woolwine the only help he could offer is available through probation.
“It’s a hard process to go through,” the judge said of the process of overcoming a drug addiction. “There are going to be bumps in the road. We will work with you as long as you work with us, but that’s about all I can offer you at this point.’
Woolwine, who was already on probation, faced a maximum of 80 years in prison on the two morphine distribution charges.
Judge Turk imposed a 10-year sentence on each, with all but a year on each suspended. He will be placed on three years of supervised probation upon release from custody and his privilege to operate a motor vehicle in Virginia has been suspended for 12 months (six on each count).
The judge agreed to give Woolwine until May 16 to report to jail to begin serving the sentence.

In summarizing evidence in the case, Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Skip Schwab said a confidential informant purchased two morphine pills from Woolwine on June 18 and, then again on June 19. He said the pills cost $30 apiece.