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New plane restrictions at Loving Field

Radio-controlled airplanes will still be able to fly at Loving Field, but the louder, non-electric, models will be restricted to Tuesdays and Saturdays.
Pulaski Town Council approved the restrictions, but several councilmen indicated they didn’t think the action was going to put the issue to rest.
“I don’t think this is going to accomplish anything. I expect it’ll come right back to us,” Mayor Jeff Worrell said. He questioned why the model airplane enthusiasts would want to continue flying in an area where residents do not want them.
As many as 100 residents of the Robinson Tract community recently signed a petition requesting the town to prohibit the flying of radio-controlled airplanes at the park. Residents contend the devices are not only loud, but also destructive to their properties and a nuisance to the residents and motorists.
Although Loving Field is outside the town limits, the portion of the property that includes the old airstrip is owned by the Town of Pulaski. The town recently deeded to ball fields to the county.
Dave Hart, director of parks and facilities for the town, said he met with Clint Ison II, president of the New River Valley Aces radio-controlled airplane club, after an April 7 town council meeting to discuss a reduction in flying times.
Hart said the group agreed to limit flying of the “nitro” (fuel) powered planes to Tuesdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to dusk. Planes that operate on electric engines can be flown any day.
“The differences in the two types of planes is significant, as electric planes are basically noiseless and have a much smaller flying range,” Hart states in a memo to Town Manager John Hawley. The memo also was provided to town council members.
“Hopefully this will satisfy, to some extent, the largest of neighbors concerns, that of noise and planes flying beyond the Loving field property boundaries,” the memo continues.
Hart said club members apparently also have remained on the property “well after dark” even though no planes were flying.
Under the new regulations, the members will have to abide by a “dusk rule,” which requires the members to be” packed up and gone from the property each evening as soon as possible.”
Councilman Morgan Welker, who has questioned town council’s authority to restrict the club from using the field, said the proposal Hart submitted “sounds pretty good. I think we should give it a try.”
Councilman Robert Bopp said he thinks the aircraft should be restricted to the portion of property owned by the town.
However, some councilmen and town staff questioned the town’s authority to restrict air space.
Bopp is the son of Charles Bopp, Robinson District representative on Pulaski County Board of Supervisors. On behalf of his constituents, Charles Bopp asked the town to prohibit the club from flying planes at the park.
According to Tuesday’s discussion, there is a possibility the county may allow the club to fly at the old landfill on Cloyd’s Mountain.
Councilman H.M. Kidd said County Administrator Peter Huber indicated the landfill site had been offered to the club about 10 years ago, but club members indicated it was too windy out there.
“It’s pretty windy out at Loving Field too,” someone commented.
“Why don’t we try to offer that again?” Kidd asked.
Vice Mayor David Clark suggested “verbiage” be included in the regulations that efforts are still being made to find another location for the club to fly.
Asked whether the restrictions will apply to people flying ultra light airplanes, Hawley said the restrictions are just designed to address the radio-controlled planes.
Charles Bopp asked that it be expanded to ultra light planes, to stop them from using the property before they get started.
Several councilmen pointed out that the ultra lights apparently have been using the field for several years, based on comments made by a Draper pilot at a recent council meeting.
Hawley said the issue of ultra lights arose when he received a request from a Radford University professor wanting to fly an ultra light out of the property. He said the Draper pilot was “a surprise” to him because he was unaware ultra lights were using the airstrip.
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said it is his opinion the ultra light pilots should have to register with the town so they have some indication of who is using the property in the event a complaint is received. He said it is his understanding only about half a dozen of the pilots are using the property.
Town council decided not to develop any further restrictions for the ultra light planes, noting that the fact they weren’t even aware the pilots were using the property must be an indication they aren’t causing much of a stir among the residents.

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New plane restrictions at Loving Field

Radio-controlled airplanes will still be able to fly at Loving Field, but the louder, non-electric, models will be restricted to Tuesdays and Saturdays.
Pulaski Town Council approved the restrictions, but several councilmen indicated they didn’t think the action was going to put the issue to rest.
“I don’t think this is going to accomplish anything. I expect it’ll come right back to us,” Mayor Jeff Worrell said. He questioned why the model airplane enthusiasts would want to continue flying in an area where residents do not want them.
As many as 100 residents of the Robinson Tract community recently signed a petition requesting the town to prohibit the flying of radio-controlled airplanes at the park. Residents contend the devices are not only loud, but also destructive to their properties and a nuisance to the residents and motorists.
Although Loving Field is outside the town limits, the portion of the property that includes the old airstrip is owned by the Town of Pulaski. The town recently deeded to ball fields to the county.
Dave Hart, director of parks and facilities for the town, said he met with Clint Ison II, president of the New River Valley Aces radio-controlled airplane club, after an April 7 town council meeting to discuss a reduction in flying times.
Hart said the group agreed to limit flying of the “nitro” (fuel) powered planes to Tuesdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to dusk. Planes that operate on electric engines can be flown any day.
“The differences in the two types of planes is significant, as electric planes are basically noiseless and have a much smaller flying range,” Hart states in a memo to Town Manager John Hawley. The memo also was provided to town council members.
“Hopefully this will satisfy, to some extent, the largest of neighbors concerns, that of noise and planes flying beyond the Loving field property boundaries,” the memo continues.
Hart said club members apparently also have remained on the property “well after dark” even though no planes were flying.
Under the new regulations, the members will have to abide by a “dusk rule,” which requires the members to be” packed up and gone from the property each evening as soon as possible.”
Councilman Morgan Welker, who has questioned town council’s authority to restrict the club from using the field, said the proposal Hart submitted “sounds pretty good. I think we should give it a try.”
Councilman Robert Bopp said he thinks the aircraft should be restricted to the portion of property owned by the town.
However, some councilmen and town staff questioned the town’s authority to restrict air space.
Bopp is the son of Charles Bopp, Robinson District representative on Pulaski County Board of Supervisors. On behalf of his constituents, Charles Bopp asked the town to prohibit the club from flying planes at the park.
According to Tuesday’s discussion, there is a possibility the county may allow the club to fly at the old landfill on Cloyd’s Mountain.
Councilman H.M. Kidd said County Administrator Peter Huber indicated the landfill site had been offered to the club about 10 years ago, but club members indicated it was too windy out there.
“It’s pretty windy out at Loving Field too,” someone commented.
“Why don’t we try to offer that again?” Kidd asked.
Vice Mayor David Clark suggested “verbiage” be included in the regulations that efforts are still being made to find another location for the club to fly.
Asked whether the restrictions will apply to people flying ultra light airplanes, Hawley said the restrictions are just designed to address the radio-controlled planes.
Charles Bopp asked that it be expanded to ultra light planes, to stop them from using the property before they get started.
Several councilmen pointed out that the ultra lights apparently have been using the field for several years, based on comments made by a Draper pilot at a recent council meeting.
Hawley said the issue of ultra lights arose when he received a request from a Radford University professor wanting to fly an ultra light out of the property. He said the Draper pilot was “a surprise” to him because he was unaware ultra lights were using the airstrip.
Councilman Joel Burchett Jr. said it is his opinion the ultra light pilots should have to register with the town so they have some indication of who is using the property in the event a complaint is received. He said it is his understanding only about half a dozen of the pilots are using the property.
Town council decided not to develop any further restrictions for the ultra light planes, noting that the fact they weren’t even aware the pilots were using the property must be an indication they aren’t causing much of a stir among the residents.

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