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Dublin lowers tax rate

The Dublin Town Council voted Thursday night to lower the Town of Dublin’s real estate tax rate.
The council voted to lower the rate from $0.19 per $100 to $0.16 per $100.
Members of the council made this decision after learning that the percentage increase for real estate assessments for the Town of Dublin from 2008 to 2009 would be 36.14 percent, or a $27,766,200 increase from $76,825,700 to $104,591,900, according to values Dublin Town Manager Bill Parker received from the Commissioner of the Revenue.
The rate of $0.16 is estimated to generate a total real estate revenue of $167,347, which is a $21,378 increase over 2008, according to Parker.
He noted that lowering the real estate tax rate would not put the town in a bind, and said "we don’t count on real estate revenue to run the Town of Dublin."
Information regarding the real estate assessment value for 2009 was made available to citizens in attendance at Thursday night’s town council meeting, and a public hearing was held in regards to those values and the Town of Dublin’s real estate tax rate.
However, minimal comments were made from citizens during the public hearings.
The council ultimately voted unanimously to lower the Town of Dublin’s real estate tax rate.
Council member Edith Hampton commented that she voted to lower the tax rate to "benefit the citizens of the Town of Dublin, because they’re going to need it."
"I commend the actions of the council," said Mayor Benny Skeens, after the council voted. "They are keeping the welfare of our citizens at heart."
He added that in the years that he has served the Dublin Town Council, he has never seen the tax rate increase, and instead, has only seen it decrease, noting that at one point, it was set at $0.23 per $100.
Skeens also noted that even though they had voted to lower the rate, citizens would still most likely see an increase in their taxes, due to the increased assessment values.

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Dublin lowers tax rate

The Dublin Town Council voted Thursday night to lower the Town of Dublin’s real estate tax rate.
The council voted to lower the rate from $0.19 per $100 to $0.16 per $100.
Members of the council made this decision after learning that the percentage increase for real estate assessments for the Town of Dublin from 2008 to 2009 would be 36.14 percent, or a $27,766,200 increase from $76,825,700 to $104,591,900, according to values Dublin Town Manager Bill Parker received from the Commissioner of the Revenue.
The rate of $0.16 is estimated to generate a total real estate revenue of $167,347, which is a $21,378 increase over 2008, according to Parker.
He noted that lowering the real estate tax rate would not put the town in a bind, and said "we don’t count on real estate revenue to run the Town of Dublin."
Information regarding the real estate assessment value for 2009 was made available to citizens in attendance at Thursday night’s town council meeting, and a public hearing was held in regards to those values and the Town of Dublin’s real estate tax rate.
However, minimal comments were made from citizens during the public hearings.
The council ultimately voted unanimously to lower the Town of Dublin’s real estate tax rate.
Council member Edith Hampton commented that she voted to lower the tax rate to "benefit the citizens of the Town of Dublin, because they’re going to need it."
"I commend the actions of the council," said Mayor Benny Skeens, after the council voted. "They are keeping the welfare of our citizens at heart."
He added that in the years that he has served the Dublin Town Council, he has never seen the tax rate increase, and instead, has only seen it decrease, noting that at one point, it was set at $0.23 per $100.
Skeens also noted that even though they had voted to lower the rate, citizens would still most likely see an increase in their taxes, due to the increased assessment values.

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