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Boucher endorses Deeds for governor

Congressman Rick Boucher said it is rare for him to endorse a candidate before the primary elections, but in the case of fellow democrat Sen. Creigh Deeds, who is seeking the Democratic party’s nomination for governor, Boucher has made an exception.
Boucher said he "would not be doing a good job" if he didn’t express his "enthusiasm" for Creigh Deeds, citing Deeds’ intellect, vision, energy and long record of being highly effective and successful in Virginia, as reasons why he is endorsing Deeds.
As Deeds is a resident of Bath County, Boucher also noted his "broad rural appeal" as a practical factor that makes him the "best possible candidate for governor."
Deeds, a former prosecutor, currently serves as a state senator, representing a district that stretches from Charlottesville to the West Virginia border.
If elected governor, he said his most important task will be to work to return Virginia to a state of "economic prosperity," and work to restore confidence in the economy overall.
Among his goals to increase economic prosperity in Virginia is a long-term, state-wide transportation plan that he said would create new jobs and open up "avenues of commerce," which could create more opportunities for Virginians.
In addition, Deeds said he also plans to focus on Virginia’s "energy future." He said that "reducing our carbon footprint" and finding sources for alternative and renewable energy is going to continue to be a "big issue in the future," so he believes Virginia, which is full of natural resources such as coal, is the place where the research to find energy-related resources should take place, as it presents "enormous opportunities for economic advancement."
Improving Virginia’s workforce through higher education is another area of interest that Deeds plans to focus on.
He has developed a 10-year plan to improve Virginia’s workforce and ultimately bring in better-paying jobs through creating 70,000 new degrees over the next decade for two and four-year degree programs.
He said the keys to this plan are "affordability and accessibility," and that "cost should not be a barrier" for children in Virginia who wish to further their education.
He noted that initially, this plan would focus on "retooling" Virginia’s community colleges, as they are the "most common access point" for students within the commonwealth.
Overall, Deeds said that what he "brings to the table" in contrast with the other two candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for governor, including Brian Moran and Terry McAuliffe, is that as a resident of Bath County, which is a primarily rural area, and living away from the city areas in Northern Virginia, Richmond or Hampton Roads, he "understands rural issues."

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Boucher endorses Deeds for governor

Congressman Rick Boucher said it is rare for him to endorse a candidate before the primary elections, but in the case of fellow democrat Sen. Creigh Deeds, who is seeking the Democratic party’s nomination for governor, Boucher has made an exception.
Boucher said he "would not be doing a good job" if he didn’t express his "enthusiasm" for Creigh Deeds, citing Deeds’ intellect, vision, energy and long record of being highly effective and successful in Virginia, as reasons why he is endorsing Deeds.
As Deeds is a resident of Bath County, Boucher also noted his "broad rural appeal" as a practical factor that makes him the "best possible candidate for governor."
Deeds, a former prosecutor, currently serves as a state senator, representing a district that stretches from Charlottesville to the West Virginia border.
If elected governor, he said his most important task will be to work to return Virginia to a state of "economic prosperity," and work to restore confidence in the economy overall.
Among his goals to increase economic prosperity in Virginia is a long-term, state-wide transportation plan that he said would create new jobs and open up "avenues of commerce," which could create more opportunities for Virginians.
In addition, Deeds said he also plans to focus on Virginia’s "energy future." He said that "reducing our carbon footprint" and finding sources for alternative and renewable energy is going to continue to be a "big issue in the future," so he believes Virginia, which is full of natural resources such as coal, is the place where the research to find energy-related resources should take place, as it presents "enormous opportunities for economic advancement."
Improving Virginia’s workforce through higher education is another area of interest that Deeds plans to focus on.
He has developed a 10-year plan to improve Virginia’s workforce and ultimately bring in better-paying jobs through creating 70,000 new degrees over the next decade for two and four-year degree programs.
He said the keys to this plan are "affordability and accessibility," and that "cost should not be a barrier" for children in Virginia who wish to further their education.
He noted that initially, this plan would focus on "retooling" Virginia’s community colleges, as they are the "most common access point" for students within the commonwealth.
Overall, Deeds said that what he "brings to the table" in contrast with the other two candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for governor, including Brian Moran and Terry McAuliffe, is that as a resident of Bath County, which is a primarily rural area, and living away from the city areas in Northern Virginia, Richmond or Hampton Roads, he "understands rural issues."

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