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Angel Food Ministries help local families

“We live in a community that is economically struggling. We need to become a community that knows the hope that God supplies.”
That was Pastor Julia Armbrister’s summation of Dublin Community Hope Church of the Nazarene’s recent decision to start offering Angel Food Ministries boxes in the community. The Signature Box, which costs $30, contains a variety of nutritionally balanced food designed to feed a family of four for a week.
In a time when many families are struggling to meet their financial obligations, Armbrister said the boxes can help stretch their dollars a little farther. Plus, she added, “the food is good. We’ve been very pleased with what we’ve gotten.”
The first month the year-old church offered the food boxes, four were purchased. The second month, sales tripled to 12 and in March it more than doubled to 25.
The boxes are available to anyone, regardless of income. Within the month she hopes to be approved to accept food stamps.
“We’re not trying to take business away from area merchants,” Armbrister said. She noted purchasers will still need to get their staple items from the grocery store.
April’s signature box contains four six-ounce New York strip steaks, two pounds of boneless/skinless chicken breast chunks for stir fry, two pounds of breaded chicken breast fillets, a pound of steak fajita strips, a 20-ounce supreme pizza, 28 ounces of jumbo beef patties with gravy, a pound of all-meat hotdogs, 16 slices of individually-wrapped cheese, a pound of mixed vegetables, two pounds of French fries, 12 white corn tortillas, a pound of rice, 15 ounces of peach halves, six ounces of pancake mix, 32 ounces of shelf-stable 2% milk, a dozen eggs and a dessert.
In addition to the Signature Box, there are three other boxes: Senior and Convenience Meals ($28), Allergen-Free Food ($25), and a Seafood box ($35).
If one of those boxes is purchased, there are seven other April specials that also are available: a six-pound assorted meat box ($22) that includes two 12-ounce t-bone steaks; a 4.5-pound meat combo box ($21) that includes six eight-ounce ribeye streaks; a five-pound steak and pork combo box ($21) that includes steaks and four eight-ounce Boston butt pork chops; a chicken breast fillet box ($21) that contains 10 pounds of individually quick-frozen boneless/skinless chicken breasts; plus a hamburger steak box; fresh fruit and vegetables box; and Valencia orange box.
The deadline for ordering from April’s “menu” is April 8. To order, contact Armbrister at 674-4620 or 239-5584.
Armbrister started Dublin Community Hope in April 2008. She was ordained in 2005.
Following the Nazarene’s practice of pushing new church ministries, Armbrister resigned her post at Hollins Church of the Nazarine and came back to Pulaski County to start a new church here.
She said the church’s vision is to “serve the community by empowering, equipping and enabling them with the hope that God supplies.” This is accomplished through “being the church, not going to church.”
The group’s focus is “not on denomination,” but rather on “reaching all for Christ.”
Members and guests are invited to “come as (they) are.” In fact, she said their motto is, “jeans welcomed, tattoos admired, and hugs required.”
While most churches meet on Wednesday nights and Sunday mornings, all of Dublin Community Hope’s services are in the evening: Sundays and Wednesdays at 7 p.m.
Armbrister explained that many members work swing shifts and Sunday mornings. She said she doesn’t believe God cares when they meet, as long as they meet and serve him.
According to the group’s brochure, Sunday studies focus on personal relationships “through praise and worship with God.” Wednesday’s focus is Bible studies.
She said the “congregation” is “very relaxed” and those who come to services will always find food and drinks available.
“We have an open-door policy. Just come right in and help yourself,” she added.
The church also offers a youth ministry called “Youth on the Move,” which Armbrister says is “growing by leaps and bounds.” They meet Sundays at 7 p.m.
The children’s ministry is called KidSpace. She said it is “geared towards teaching all children they have a place just for them to learn about God.”
The “Fireproof” couples ministry is open to both married and dating couples. It meets one a week, with the meeting time set according to the couples’ schedules.
The Angel Food Ministries boxes are part of the church’s Outreach Ministry.
Armbrister and her husband, Wayne, have three teenage children whom she says, “keep us running.”
Youth pastor at the church is Michael Phillips and the children’s ministry director is Leann Phillips.
The church is located on the second floor of the David Skewes office building beside Wades Supermarket in Dublin.
For more information, contact Armbrister at the numbers listed earlier in this article.

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Angel Food Ministries help local families

“We live in a community that is economically struggling. We need to become a community that knows the hope that God supplies.”
That was Pastor Julia Armbrister’s summation of Dublin Community Hope Church of the Nazarene’s recent decision to start offering Angel Food Ministries boxes in the community. The Signature Box, which costs $30, contains a variety of nutritionally balanced food designed to feed a family of four for a week.
In a time when many families are struggling to meet their financial obligations, Armbrister said the boxes can help stretch their dollars a little farther. Plus, she added, “the food is good. We’ve been very pleased with what we’ve gotten.”
The first month the year-old church offered the food boxes, four were purchased. The second month, sales tripled to 12 and in March it more than doubled to 25.
The boxes are available to anyone, regardless of income. Within the month she hopes to be approved to accept food stamps.
“We’re not trying to take business away from area merchants,” Armbrister said. She noted purchasers will still need to get their staple items from the grocery store.
April’s signature box contains four six-ounce New York strip steaks, two pounds of boneless/skinless chicken breast chunks for stir fry, two pounds of breaded chicken breast fillets, a pound of steak fajita strips, a 20-ounce supreme pizza, 28 ounces of jumbo beef patties with gravy, a pound of all-meat hotdogs, 16 slices of individually-wrapped cheese, a pound of mixed vegetables, two pounds of French fries, 12 white corn tortillas, a pound of rice, 15 ounces of peach halves, six ounces of pancake mix, 32 ounces of shelf-stable 2% milk, a dozen eggs and a dessert.
In addition to the Signature Box, there are three other boxes: Senior and Convenience Meals ($28), Allergen-Free Food ($25), and a Seafood box ($35).
If one of those boxes is purchased, there are seven other April specials that also are available: a six-pound assorted meat box ($22) that includes two 12-ounce t-bone steaks; a 4.5-pound meat combo box ($21) that includes six eight-ounce ribeye streaks; a five-pound steak and pork combo box ($21) that includes steaks and four eight-ounce Boston butt pork chops; a chicken breast fillet box ($21) that contains 10 pounds of individually quick-frozen boneless/skinless chicken breasts; plus a hamburger steak box; fresh fruit and vegetables box; and Valencia orange box.
The deadline for ordering from April’s “menu” is April 8. To order, contact Armbrister at 674-4620 or 239-5584.
Armbrister started Dublin Community Hope in April 2008. She was ordained in 2005.
Following the Nazarene’s practice of pushing new church ministries, Armbrister resigned her post at Hollins Church of the Nazarine and came back to Pulaski County to start a new church here.
She said the church’s vision is to “serve the community by empowering, equipping and enabling them with the hope that God supplies.” This is accomplished through “being the church, not going to church.”
The group’s focus is “not on denomination,” but rather on “reaching all for Christ.”
Members and guests are invited to “come as (they) are.” In fact, she said their motto is, “jeans welcomed, tattoos admired, and hugs required.”
While most churches meet on Wednesday nights and Sunday mornings, all of Dublin Community Hope’s services are in the evening: Sundays and Wednesdays at 7 p.m.
Armbrister explained that many members work swing shifts and Sunday mornings. She said she doesn’t believe God cares when they meet, as long as they meet and serve him.
According to the group’s brochure, Sunday studies focus on personal relationships “through praise and worship with God.” Wednesday’s focus is Bible studies.
She said the “congregation” is “very relaxed” and those who come to services will always find food and drinks available.
“We have an open-door policy. Just come right in and help yourself,” she added.
The church also offers a youth ministry called “Youth on the Move,” which Armbrister says is “growing by leaps and bounds.” They meet Sundays at 7 p.m.
The children’s ministry is called KidSpace. She said it is “geared towards teaching all children they have a place just for them to learn about God.”
The “Fireproof” couples ministry is open to both married and dating couples. It meets one a week, with the meeting time set according to the couples’ schedules.
The Angel Food Ministries boxes are part of the church’s Outreach Ministry.
Armbrister and her husband, Wayne, have three teenage children whom she says, “keep us running.”
Youth pastor at the church is Michael Phillips and the children’s ministry director is Leann Phillips.
The church is located on the second floor of the David Skewes office building beside Wades Supermarket in Dublin.
For more information, contact Armbrister at the numbers listed earlier in this article.

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