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Can you spell C-H-A-M-P?

A Pulaski County student out-spelled 18 district champion spellers from across the region this past Saturday in the 36th Annual Regional Spelling Bee, held in Roanoke.
The bee ended with 13-year-old Molly Futrell, an eighth grade student from Dublin Middle School, earning the title of "champion speller" for the region, after correctly spelling the word "monogamous."
As champion, Futrell will represent the local region in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, scheduled for May 26-28 in Washington D.C..
The saying "third time is a charm" seems to have been in true in the case of Futrell, as this was her third year competing at the regional level, but only the first year she has qualified to compete at the National Spelling Bee.
Last year, as a seventh grader, Futrell represented Pulaski County at the regional competition, earning fourth place. In addition, she competed in the regional bee as a Dublin Elementary School fifth-grader, and earned second place.
Futrell said she was definitely more nervous at Saturday’s bee than she had been at Pulaski County’s district bee in February at the County Administration Building. She said that the audience was much larger and that to spell, each competitor had to walk to the center of the stage and spell into a microphone, which was different from the district bee.
She also said that the regional competition "lasted longer than any other bee I’ve been in," noting that once it was down to three spellers, they spelled for several rounds before someone was eliminated.
As for how she has prepared for each bee, Futrell said she worked with the "Spell It!" study booklet that is given to participants every year.
"I also read a lot, which helps," she said.
For the National Spelling Bee, she plans to continue using the study booklet, and said that a parent at the regional bee suggested that she study the Consolidated Word List, which is available at the National Spelling Bee website, and is described as "a compilation of over 100 Scripps National Spelling Bee word lists dating as far back as 1950."
Along with having the opportunity to compete in the National Spelling Bee in May, Futrell said she is looking forward to touring Washington D.C. for the first time while she is in the area.
Traveling with Futrell to Washington D.C. will be her parents, Doug and Adlyn Futrell, and her sister.
Besides her outstanding skills as a speller, Futrell said that math is probably her best subject in school. Outside the classroom, she is currently trying out for the DMS track team.
As for the future, Futrell said she is interested in possibly pursuing a career as a lawyer, doctor or veterinarian.

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Can you spell C-H-A-M-P?

A Pulaski County student out-spelled 18 district champion spellers from across the region this past Saturday in the 36th Annual Regional Spelling Bee, held in Roanoke.
The bee ended with 13-year-old Molly Futrell, an eighth grade student from Dublin Middle School, earning the title of "champion speller" for the region, after correctly spelling the word "monogamous."
As champion, Futrell will represent the local region in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, scheduled for May 26-28 in Washington D.C..
The saying "third time is a charm" seems to have been in true in the case of Futrell, as this was her third year competing at the regional level, but only the first year she has qualified to compete at the National Spelling Bee.
Last year, as a seventh grader, Futrell represented Pulaski County at the regional competition, earning fourth place. In addition, she competed in the regional bee as a Dublin Elementary School fifth-grader, and earned second place.
Futrell said she was definitely more nervous at Saturday’s bee than she had been at Pulaski County’s district bee in February at the County Administration Building. She said that the audience was much larger and that to spell, each competitor had to walk to the center of the stage and spell into a microphone, which was different from the district bee.
She also said that the regional competition "lasted longer than any other bee I’ve been in," noting that once it was down to three spellers, they spelled for several rounds before someone was eliminated.
As for how she has prepared for each bee, Futrell said she worked with the "Spell It!" study booklet that is given to participants every year.
"I also read a lot, which helps," she said.
For the National Spelling Bee, she plans to continue using the study booklet, and said that a parent at the regional bee suggested that she study the Consolidated Word List, which is available at the National Spelling Bee website, and is described as "a compilation of over 100 Scripps National Spelling Bee word lists dating as far back as 1950."
Along with having the opportunity to compete in the National Spelling Bee in May, Futrell said she is looking forward to touring Washington D.C. for the first time while she is in the area.
Traveling with Futrell to Washington D.C. will be her parents, Doug and Adlyn Futrell, and her sister.
Besides her outstanding skills as a speller, Futrell said that math is probably her best subject in school. Outside the classroom, she is currently trying out for the DMS track team.
As for the future, Futrell said she is interested in possibly pursuing a career as a lawyer, doctor or veterinarian.

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