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Rezoning recommended for Rt. 100 land

Pulaski County planners are recommending land off Route 100 be rezoned from Agriculture to Industry to accommodate a business that has been operating there in violation of zoning requirements.
Zoning Administrator Melody Taylor said she became aware of the situation at Howard M. and Carolyn Jean Woodyard’s property as the result of a complaint filed with her office. The three-acre tract is located at 6353 Kent Farm Road, across Cleburne Boulevard (Route 100) from the New River Valley Airport.
Although the property is zoned for Agricultural (A-1) uses, Taylor said she found a business in operation that sells landscaping material and services and sells equipment.
Upon learning of the violation, Taylor said county staff met with the Woodyards, who indicated a desire to continue operating the business.
Alternatives were discussed and the couple chose to seek a rezone of the property to Industrial (I-1) so that the business could continue to operate.
During a public hearing held Tuesday night, several nearby property owners expressed concern about the impact industrial zoning could have on the surrounding property. They indicated a more restrictive zoning such as Commercial (CM-1) would be preferable.
Franklin Crigger, who has lived next to the tract of land for a number of years, said he is concerned the Industrial designation would "kill the value" of his property. He indicated stormwater run-off from the lot has been a problem for a number of years.
Crigger acknowledged the property has been used for business ventures for years. However, he indicated he isn’t sure what business is being conducted on the property because there are two signs on the fence: Woodyard Construction, and Stone and Gravel Inc.
"I’d like to see the lot get cleaned up and quit being used for a catch-all," Crigger said of the Woodyard’s property.
Douglas Blair said he has lived on nearby property for 34 years.
"We’ve been through a lot with that particular lot," he told Pulaski County Planning Commission, referring to the fact it used to be a coal yard and has changed hands several times. He said he’s not opposed to the new owners or the business, but he asked if there is another alternative to Industrial zoning.
Blair said he is concerned the rezone would create a "nuisance" that "may not necessarily be compatible" with the residential neighborhood.
Woodyard said when he purchased the property he knew he would need the business "to pay for it." He said there was a "misunderstanding" over the zoning.
While he intends to store a few pieces of equipment on the property, he said he has no intention of developing a "junkyard."
Woodyard said he wasn’t aware of the run-off issues involving Crigger’s property. However, he said he would check into it. He indicated a desire to clean up the area closest to the Criggers to address Criggers’ concerns.
Taylor pointed out that Woodyard is required to present a site plan indicating the intended use of the property as part of a rezone.
Asked how the violation was overlooked by the county, Taylor said the coal yard was on the property prior to zoning and, therefore, was a grandfathered use. However, when the coal yard was shut down, it was no longer allowed to be used for business purposes.
Taylor indicated she was made aware of another business on the property after the coal yard was shut down. She was in the process of working with that property owner when those business plans apparently fell through.
Asked by a planner whether the business could operate under the existing zoning with a special use permit, Taylor said "no." She said it could operate under a Commercial (CM-1) designation, but there are no other Commercial zones in that area, so it would constitute spot zoning to rezone to CM-1.
Taylor pointed out that Woodyard has volunteered to eliminate a number of potential uses as a condition of the I-1 rezone.
Community Development Director Shawn Utt said it is his opinion the Industrial zoning with limited uses is actually more restrictive than a CM-1 designation would be.
Ultimately, the planners recommended approval of the rezone as long as county staff can work with Woodyard and neighboring property owners on developing a list of proffered restrictions to the I-1 designation.

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Rezoning recommended for Rt. 100 land

Pulaski County planners are recommending land off Route 100 be rezoned from Agriculture to Industry to accommodate a business that has been operating there in violation of zoning requirements.
Zoning Administrator Melody Taylor said she became aware of the situation at Howard M. and Carolyn Jean Woodyard’s property as the result of a complaint filed with her office. The three-acre tract is located at 6353 Kent Farm Road, across Cleburne Boulevard (Route 100) from the New River Valley Airport.
Although the property is zoned for Agricultural (A-1) uses, Taylor said she found a business in operation that sells landscaping material and services and sells equipment.
Upon learning of the violation, Taylor said county staff met with the Woodyards, who indicated a desire to continue operating the business.
Alternatives were discussed and the couple chose to seek a rezone of the property to Industrial (I-1) so that the business could continue to operate.
During a public hearing held Tuesday night, several nearby property owners expressed concern about the impact industrial zoning could have on the surrounding property. They indicated a more restrictive zoning such as Commercial (CM-1) would be preferable.
Franklin Crigger, who has lived next to the tract of land for a number of years, said he is concerned the Industrial designation would "kill the value" of his property. He indicated stormwater run-off from the lot has been a problem for a number of years.
Crigger acknowledged the property has been used for business ventures for years. However, he indicated he isn’t sure what business is being conducted on the property because there are two signs on the fence: Woodyard Construction, and Stone and Gravel Inc.
"I’d like to see the lot get cleaned up and quit being used for a catch-all," Crigger said of the Woodyard’s property.
Douglas Blair said he has lived on nearby property for 34 years.
"We’ve been through a lot with that particular lot," he told Pulaski County Planning Commission, referring to the fact it used to be a coal yard and has changed hands several times. He said he’s not opposed to the new owners or the business, but he asked if there is another alternative to Industrial zoning.
Blair said he is concerned the rezone would create a "nuisance" that "may not necessarily be compatible" with the residential neighborhood.
Woodyard said when he purchased the property he knew he would need the business "to pay for it." He said there was a "misunderstanding" over the zoning.
While he intends to store a few pieces of equipment on the property, he said he has no intention of developing a "junkyard."
Woodyard said he wasn’t aware of the run-off issues involving Crigger’s property. However, he said he would check into it. He indicated a desire to clean up the area closest to the Criggers to address Criggers’ concerns.
Taylor pointed out that Woodyard is required to present a site plan indicating the intended use of the property as part of a rezone.
Asked how the violation was overlooked by the county, Taylor said the coal yard was on the property prior to zoning and, therefore, was a grandfathered use. However, when the coal yard was shut down, it was no longer allowed to be used for business purposes.
Taylor indicated she was made aware of another business on the property after the coal yard was shut down. She was in the process of working with that property owner when those business plans apparently fell through.
Asked by a planner whether the business could operate under the existing zoning with a special use permit, Taylor said "no." She said it could operate under a Commercial (CM-1) designation, but there are no other Commercial zones in that area, so it would constitute spot zoning to rezone to CM-1.
Taylor pointed out that Woodyard has volunteered to eliminate a number of potential uses as a condition of the I-1 rezone.
Community Development Director Shawn Utt said it is his opinion the Industrial zoning with limited uses is actually more restrictive than a CM-1 designation would be.
Ultimately, the planners recommended approval of the rezone as long as county staff can work with Woodyard and neighboring property owners on developing a list of proffered restrictions to the I-1 designation.

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