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No biosolids thus far

Unless the quality improves soon, it appears there won’t be any biosolids (treated sewer sludge) available to fertilize fields this spring.
Mac McCutchan, superintendent at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, said molybdenum levels continue to be a problem in the plant’s biosolids.
Molybdenum, commonly referred to as "moly", is a potentially toxic chemical element containing lead.
For quite some time now the authority has had to landfill its biosolids rather than use it for fertilizer because "moly" levels exceed Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requirements.
For a brief period last year, the level dropped within requirements and the authority was able to set aside some fertilizer-grade biosolids. Unfortunately, McCutchan said that has all been used.
The plant maintains a list of farmers requesting biosolids when they are available. To be added to the list, call the authority at 639-3947.
Three years ago, the Virginia General Assembly made changes in regulations regarding land applications of biosolids. It placed regulation wholly under the DEQ. It had been split between DEQ and the Department of Health. Under the new regulations, DEQ is required to conduct unannounced site inspections when biosolids are being applied.
Pepper’s Ferry has been applying biosolids to several area farmlands since around 1998. The applications are free and serve a dual purpose: first, it’s a cheaper way for the treatment plant to dispose of its sludge and, second, the farmer gets free fertilizer.
McCutchan said both sides save money by using biosolids for fertilizer.
According to Associated Press, biosolids consist mostly of human waste treated to reduce germs that can cause disease.

The Peppers Ferry plant is one of only a few treatment plants in Virginia that offer biosolids applications.

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No biosolids thus far

Unless the quality improves soon, it appears there won’t be any biosolids (treated sewer sludge) available to fertilize fields this spring.
Mac McCutchan, superintendent at Pepper’s Ferry Regional Wastewater Treatment Authority, said molybdenum levels continue to be a problem in the plant’s biosolids.
Molybdenum, commonly referred to as "moly", is a potentially toxic chemical element containing lead.
For quite some time now the authority has had to landfill its biosolids rather than use it for fertilizer because "moly" levels exceed Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) requirements.
For a brief period last year, the level dropped within requirements and the authority was able to set aside some fertilizer-grade biosolids. Unfortunately, McCutchan said that has all been used.
The plant maintains a list of farmers requesting biosolids when they are available. To be added to the list, call the authority at 639-3947.
Three years ago, the Virginia General Assembly made changes in regulations regarding land applications of biosolids. It placed regulation wholly under the DEQ. It had been split between DEQ and the Department of Health. Under the new regulations, DEQ is required to conduct unannounced site inspections when biosolids are being applied.
Pepper’s Ferry has been applying biosolids to several area farmlands since around 1998. The applications are free and serve a dual purpose: first, it’s a cheaper way for the treatment plant to dispose of its sludge and, second, the farmer gets free fertilizer.
McCutchan said both sides save money by using biosolids for fertilizer.
According to Associated Press, biosolids consist mostly of human waste treated to reduce germs that can cause disease.

The Peppers Ferry plant is one of only a few treatment plants in Virginia that offer biosolids applications.

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