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New Pulaski train station possibly delayed

Town of Pulaski officials had hoped to have the new train station ready for a June 11, 2010 grand opening, but it appears that may not happen.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley’s plans to have a negotiated architectural services contract ready by Tuesday night’s council meeting has been delayed as a result of several costs the town’s insurance company is declining to cover.
While three of the five issues holding up the contract could be resolved by decisions of town council, Hawley said two others need additional negotiation between the town, the insurance company and the proposed architect, David E. Gall, Architect, P.A. of North Carolina.
According to Hawley, the two primary concerns are the fire suppression system and the building’s insulation. The insurance company is declining to cover the cost of either at this point, meaning the town would have to foot the bill.
The historic train station was not equipped with a sprinkler system when it was heavily damaged by fire Nov. 17, but the town had put insulation in the attic of the structure.
Hawley said earlier the insurance company agreed to cover the cost of restoring the station to its original design.
Even though there was no system in the old structure, it is the town’s position that a fire suppression system should be covered by insurance because the system is necessitated by state building codes.
A sprinkler system wasn’t required in the old building because it pre-dated building codes and was exempt by virtue of grandfathering. Now that it has to be rebuilt, it will have to meet all code requirements.
"It’s pretty clear the insurance is not going to cover everything we need to do over there," Hawley told members of town council. "We had hoped for a June 11, 2010 opening date, but this is probably going to push that out two or three months."
The issues council will need to decide whether to:
• Install a slate roof at the town’s expense, or stay with a composite roof like was on the old structure. Ultimately, council decided to go with the composite roof and let the insurance cover it. Mayor Jeff Worrell said he doubted anyone realized the old roof wasn’t slate anyway;
• Include a food preparation or kitchen area inside the station. There has been some discussion about leasing space in the station to a food vendor with limited offerings; and
• Install hardwood flooring or laminate flooring. Hawley said the insurance only covers laminate.
Council asked Hawley to consult with Gall to get an estimated cost of the kitchen area and hardwood flooring. A decision will then be made based on the anticipated cost.
Hawley said he hopes to have the contract matter resolved by the March 17 work session.

New Pulaski train station possibly delayed

Town of Pulaski officials had hoped to have the new train station ready for a June 11, 2010 grand opening, but it appears that may not happen.
Pulaski Town Manager John Hawley’s plans to have a negotiated architectural services contract ready by Tuesday night’s council meeting has been delayed as a result of several costs the town’s insurance company is declining to cover.
While three of the five issues holding up the contract could be resolved by decisions of town council, Hawley said two others need additional negotiation between the town, the insurance company and the proposed architect, David E. Gall, Architect, P.A. of North Carolina.
According to Hawley, the two primary concerns are the fire suppression system and the building’s insulation. The insurance company is declining to cover the cost of either at this point, meaning the town would have to foot the bill.
The historic train station was not equipped with a sprinkler system when it was heavily damaged by fire Nov. 17, but the town had put insulation in the attic of the structure.
Hawley said earlier the insurance company agreed to cover the cost of restoring the station to its original design.
Even though there was no system in the old structure, it is the town’s position that a fire suppression system should be covered by insurance because the system is necessitated by state building codes.
A sprinkler system wasn’t required in the old building because it pre-dated building codes and was exempt by virtue of grandfathering. Now that it has to be rebuilt, it will have to meet all code requirements.
"It’s pretty clear the insurance is not going to cover everything we need to do over there," Hawley told members of town council. "We had hoped for a June 11, 2010 opening date, but this is probably going to push that out two or three months."
The issues council will need to decide whether to:
• Install a slate roof at the town’s expense, or stay with a composite roof like was on the old structure. Ultimately, council decided to go with the composite roof and let the insurance cover it. Mayor Jeff Worrell said he doubted anyone realized the old roof wasn’t slate anyway;
• Include a food preparation or kitchen area inside the station. There has been some discussion about leasing space in the station to a food vendor with limited offerings; and
• Install hardwood flooring or laminate flooring. Hawley said the insurance only covers laminate.
Council asked Hawley to consult with Gall to get an estimated cost of the kitchen area and hardwood flooring. A decision will then be made based on the anticipated cost.
Hawley said he hopes to have the contract matter resolved by the March 17 work session.