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Moran gains local Dems’ backing

Area democrats gathered at Pulaski County Library Wednesday to endorse a former Arlington prosecutor and state delegate who is seeking the 2009 democratic nomination for governor.
While introducing Brian Moran to the group, local Democratic Party Chairman Mike Fleenor said Moran is no stranger to Pulaski. He noted that Moran came to the area two years ago to put support behind the democratic candidates in the 2007 General Election.
“He had me when he asked me ‘what are you’re problems in rural law enforcement,’” Pulaski County Sheriff Jim Davis said of Moran.
Moran said he is “very passionate” about where Virginia is headed.
He noted that Senator Mark Warner, a former governor, urged him to run for the House of Delegates in 1994. He said he eventually became chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, before stepping down from the House in 2008 to seek the governorship.
Moran said the Democratic Party’s success in the governor’s race over the last two terms has placed a “bullseye on our chests” and left the GOP “hungry. They will be coming after us.”
Nonetheless, Moran said he is proud of his record of “fighting for Virginians and I’m ready for whatever they have to throw at me.”
The candidate outlined some of his goals for Virginia, including:
• Alternative energy — He says it “will create thousands of new jobs.”
• Healthcare for all Virginians, especially children — He said he has a plan that will enroll every child in the state in a healthcare program. “We must get serious about prevention” when it comes to healthcare, he added.
• Education — “We must invest in our children,” he said, noting that he wants to see teacher pay increased. “There is no more important position in the school than the teacher.”
• Transportation — He said he looks forward to working with the communities along Interstate 81 to find ways of addressing the need for improvements. “We have starved our transportation infrastructure for years and we need to change that.”
“We have a lot of challenges, but we’re ready to get to work,” Moran said.
He was asked about college tuition costs and addressing high school drop-out rates.
Although it is a “sticky subject,” Moran said he favors expanding opportunities for out-of-state students to attend college in Virginia because “they subsidize our local students.” He said that while it is good for state students to have more access to state schools, the cost of attending those schools needs to be affordable.
As for the drop-out rate, he said he favors initiatives to entice students to stay in school at least until they have a high school diploma, given today’s economy. He said improving technology is one way to keep students “interested and engaged.”

With regards to public safety, Moran said he believes the state needs to invest more money in training, personnel and employee benefits for law enforcement to help stop crime before it occurs. He added, “to have a successful prosecution, you have to have a good arrest and a good investigation.” More training and better benefits to hold on to experienced officers will help achieve that, he said.

Moran gains local Dems’ backing

Area democrats gathered at Pulaski County Library Wednesday to endorse a former Arlington prosecutor and state delegate who is seeking the 2009 democratic nomination for governor.
While introducing Brian Moran to the group, local Democratic Party Chairman Mike Fleenor said Moran is no stranger to Pulaski. He noted that Moran came to the area two years ago to put support behind the democratic candidates in the 2007 General Election.
“He had me when he asked me ‘what are you’re problems in rural law enforcement,’” Pulaski County Sheriff Jim Davis said of Moran.
Moran said he is “very passionate” about where Virginia is headed.
He noted that Senator Mark Warner, a former governor, urged him to run for the House of Delegates in 1994. He said he eventually became chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, before stepping down from the House in 2008 to seek the governorship.
Moran said the Democratic Party’s success in the governor’s race over the last two terms has placed a “bullseye on our chests” and left the GOP “hungry. They will be coming after us.”
Nonetheless, Moran said he is proud of his record of “fighting for Virginians and I’m ready for whatever they have to throw at me.”
The candidate outlined some of his goals for Virginia, including:
• Alternative energy — He says it “will create thousands of new jobs.”
• Healthcare for all Virginians, especially children — He said he has a plan that will enroll every child in the state in a healthcare program. “We must get serious about prevention” when it comes to healthcare, he added.
• Education — “We must invest in our children,” he said, noting that he wants to see teacher pay increased. “There is no more important position in the school than the teacher.”
• Transportation — He said he looks forward to working with the communities along Interstate 81 to find ways of addressing the need for improvements. “We have starved our transportation infrastructure for years and we need to change that.”
“We have a lot of challenges, but we’re ready to get to work,” Moran said.
He was asked about college tuition costs and addressing high school drop-out rates.
Although it is a “sticky subject,” Moran said he favors expanding opportunities for out-of-state students to attend college in Virginia because “they subsidize our local students.” He said that while it is good for state students to have more access to state schools, the cost of attending those schools needs to be affordable.
As for the drop-out rate, he said he favors initiatives to entice students to stay in school at least until they have a high school diploma, given today’s economy. He said improving technology is one way to keep students “interested and engaged.”

With regards to public safety, Moran said he believes the state needs to invest more money in training, personnel and employee benefits for law enforcement to help stop crime before it occurs. He added, “to have a successful prosecution, you have to have a good arrest and a good investigation.” More training and better benefits to hold on to experienced officers will help achieve that, he said.