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The third John Floyd

Doctor John Floyd died in 1837 at the young age of 54, while visiting Sweet Springs health spa in what is now the state of West Virginia.
Like his father, Doctor Floyd  packed a lot of living in a few years. He was a medical doctor, a farmer, a legislator, a U.S. Senator, and governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia. His was a lifetime of service to his fellow people. His wife Leticia had 12 children to share in the pleasures of life on his Thorn Spring plantation. In memory of the young lady who unlocked the prison door at Dartmouth prison in England, setting his father free, the parents named one of their daughters Carolee, after her.  A son, the third in a line of John Floyds was destined to become governor of Virginia in a period of 21 years.
John Buchanan Floyd, the doctor’s son played along the banks of Thorn Spring Branch and Peak Creek in Pulaski County,  and rode through the green fields that are now  a part of the Thorn Spring golf course. After being educated in schools in Arkansas and South Carolina, he returned to Virginia and started to practice law. He married a Preston of Washington County, then built a home on the waters of Peak Creek in Pulaski, on his father’s farm. Like his father, John B. Floyd turned to politics, serving several terms in the Virginia State Legislature, while residing in Washington County, Va.
In 1849, he became governor of Virginia, serving four years, devoting a great deal of his time and energy to farming. Later he served as Secretary of War under President Buchanan prior to the Civil War.
Historians have not been very kind to John Buchanan Floyd. Even though he attained the highest rank of the three Johns, he was not highly regarded by his peers. Early on he opposed secession, then with a change in the political winds, he became an ardent secessionist. President Buchanan asked for his resignation as Secretary of War because of his poor handling of finances, and other reasons.
The third John Floyd was a brigadier general in the Confederate Army in the Civil War, serving under Robert E. Lee in the western section of Virginia, where he continued to show his incompetence. After his defeat at Fort Donelson, he was removed from command by Confederate President Jefferson Davis. This probably came about as a result of a disagreement  the two had at an earlier time.
Of the three John Floyds who walked across the pages of Virginia history, my favorite is Doctor John, who chose our own neighborhood as a place to build his home, set up his medical practice, and raise his children. He was a dedicated public servant who never backed away from what he thought was right, even if it went against the president of the United States, and even if that president was Old Hickory himself, Andrew Jackson. 
 Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski. 

The third John Floyd

Doctor John Floyd died in 1837 at the young age of 54, while visiting Sweet Springs health spa in what is now the state of West Virginia.
Like his father, Doctor Floyd  packed a lot of living in a few years. He was a medical doctor, a farmer, a legislator, a U.S. Senator, and governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia. His was a lifetime of service to his fellow people. His wife Leticia had 12 children to share in the pleasures of life on his Thorn Spring plantation. In memory of the young lady who unlocked the prison door at Dartmouth prison in England, setting his father free, the parents named one of their daughters Carolee, after her.  A son, the third in a line of John Floyds was destined to become governor of Virginia in a period of 21 years.
John Buchanan Floyd, the doctor’s son played along the banks of Thorn Spring Branch and Peak Creek in Pulaski County,  and rode through the green fields that are now  a part of the Thorn Spring golf course. After being educated in schools in Arkansas and South Carolina, he returned to Virginia and started to practice law. He married a Preston of Washington County, then built a home on the waters of Peak Creek in Pulaski, on his father’s farm. Like his father, John B. Floyd turned to politics, serving several terms in the Virginia State Legislature, while residing in Washington County, Va.
In 1849, he became governor of Virginia, serving four years, devoting a great deal of his time and energy to farming. Later he served as Secretary of War under President Buchanan prior to the Civil War.
Historians have not been very kind to John Buchanan Floyd. Even though he attained the highest rank of the three Johns, he was not highly regarded by his peers. Early on he opposed secession, then with a change in the political winds, he became an ardent secessionist. President Buchanan asked for his resignation as Secretary of War because of his poor handling of finances, and other reasons.
The third John Floyd was a brigadier general in the Confederate Army in the Civil War, serving under Robert E. Lee in the western section of Virginia, where he continued to show his incompetence. After his defeat at Fort Donelson, he was removed from command by Confederate President Jefferson Davis. This probably came about as a result of a disagreement  the two had at an earlier time.
Of the three John Floyds who walked across the pages of Virginia history, my favorite is Doctor John, who chose our own neighborhood as a place to build his home, set up his medical practice, and raise his children. He was a dedicated public servant who never backed away from what he thought was right, even if it went against the president of the United States, and even if that president was Old Hickory himself, Andrew Jackson. 
 Lloyd Mathews is a retired land surveyor and a historian who lives in Pulaski.